Nosaj Thing Would Like Their Stolen Gear Back

Nosaj-April17.jpg
Photo courtesy of Life or Death PR
No questions asked.
Nosaj Thing, the electronic musician/producer who has worked with the likes of Kendrick Lamar and Kid Cudi, was robbed of his group's equipment early Thursday morning on Kirby and Richmond.

According to the band's Facebook page, their tour van was broken into and all of their equipment, including Macbooks and other devices, was taken.

The band is offering a cash reward for any information leading to the retrieval of their gear. Please contact the band on their Facebook pageĀ if you know anything about Thursday morning's robbery.


More »

How Not to Behave at a Houston Concert

Categories: WTF Island

Hozier-April3.jpg
Photo by Jack Gorman
The concert that inspired this article -- Hozier at Warehouse Live last month
Unfortunately, the last show I attended in Houston was the worst show I have ever been to. However, the fault was not that of the person onstage, but of the crowd. In between acts, the people around me were also complaining about how rude everyone was. The couple beside me had even driven from another state and were shocked by how disrespectful Houstonians are at shows.

I apologized profusely and assured them that we aren't all bad, but the more I thought about it, the more I thought that our city needs to be a little more polite at shows. Here are ten ways to have manners at a concert and still have a good time.


More »

Six Great Covers of TV Theme Songs

WeirdAlEmmysScreencap.jpg
"Weird Al" Yankovic put his own twist on covering TV show theme songs at this year's Emmy Awards.
Television's influence on our musical vocabulary is vast. These days, singing shows are determining new pop stars. A great TV theme can become iconic -- Sanford and Son, Friends, The Sopranos -- and shows like The Simpsons, Family Guy and Scrubs have become legendary for their in-show musical performances.

Of course, famous bands are paying attention to that too; they get those songs stuck in their head just like we do. Few have a big enough sense of humor to cover a silly TV-show theme, but when they do, it's always something special. Here are a few favorites.


More »

Rock Songs That Will Creep the Hell Out of You

Categories: WTF Island

deadhorse-1001.jpg
Yep, that would about do it.
There have been popular songs with creepy or spooky lyrics since the beginning of rock music. Sure, entire subgenres are intentionally dark and scary, but when you filter out songs by shock-rockers, heavy metal bands and gothic groups, we are still left with plenty of songs that seem a little "off" in disturbing ways.


8. "Wildfire,"Michael Martin Murphy (1975)
This gentle-sounding '70s soft-rock tune is a weird one for sure. The lyrics:

She comes down from Yellow Mountain
On a dark, flat land she ride
On a pony she named Wildfire
With a whirlwind by her side
On a cold Nebraska night

Oh, they say she died one winter
When there came a killing frost
And the pony she named Wildfire
Busted down its stall
In a blizzard he was lost


More »

Iggy or Isn't She? "Fancy" Star's No-Show Leaves Some Fans Upset

iggybanner-0818.jpg
Some Houston fans are upset and wondering what happened after rapper/pop star Iggy Azalea's purported appearance at a popular Midtown dance club this weekend never materialized -- or if it was ever truly on the books to begin with.

The event had been promoted by Houston-based Sticky Promo, the local nightlife company behind other nights such as Twerk Thursdays and Devious Saturdays at Limelight, and Seductive Fridays at Washington Avenue club Dekan. According to this Eventbrite page, Azalea had been advertised to appear at Limelight this past Saturday night, although not to perform.

Even so, some said $22 for a possible glimpse of Azalea and maybe an autograph was still too low for an artist who has blown up to become one of the year's biggest stars. The event was billed as "no refunds, returns or exchanges."


More »

The Five Most Surprising Nine Inch Nails Tracks

NINNewPhoto-0813.jpg
Photo courtesy of thefunstar.com
Nine Inch Nails circa 2014
With this Saturday's Nine Inch Nails/Soundgarden supershow at Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion, now with added opener The Dillinger Escape Plan to make it even sweeter, we're digging deep into our collections of their records, stripping them for all their best parts.

Nine Inch Nails is the kind of band who are fairly dependable. Trent Reznor writes very much in the mode of either angry or depressed. He's strayed from the formula plenty, but rarely so far as to shock anyone. However, these five really stood out as the most shocking turns Reznor has taken in his 25-year career.


More »

The "Swagger Wagon" & Other Great Rap Commercial Fails

busta-rhymes-toyota-commercial.jpg
Face it -- hip-hop has been commercialized for a very long time.

Hammer yukked it up on Saturday mornings with his own cartoon, 2Pac and Biggie shilled malt liquor, plenty of others have hawked FUBU and Lugz (I think Birdman still sells Lugz), and Ludacris pushed Pepsi (and pissed off Bill O'Reilly). Then of course there's anything regarding Macklemore, Iggy Azalea and more.

We've gone through some dire moments in commercial products being tossed hip-hop ideas and stances for product placement. None, however, may be able to top Busta Rhymes, the "Swagger Wagon" and the 2015 Toyota Sienna.


More »

Queen Minus Freddie Mercury? No Thank You

fred-0709.jpg
funnyjunk.com
Friends have urged me unsuccessfully to attend tonight's Queen concert with them. As the band and guest singer Adam Lambert tour, I imagine this scene unfolding for others elsewhere. Some are excited to see Brian May, a we're-not-worthy, guitar-playing legend. Others are interested in Lambert, whose voice is matched, if not surpassed, by his panache, and how he'll interpret the band's array of insanely great songs.

These are strong arguments for, which makes the argument against seem so basic. For others like me, the defense for our disinterest boils down to this: no Freddie Mercury. As honest as it is, it sounds childish. I've said it out loud and can tell you it recalls a grade-school playground debate.

"How come you don't wanna come?!" they whine.

"Because Freddie Mercury won't be there! Duh!"


More »

Rolling Stone's Ridiculous Top 100 Country Songs: The Second Half

hank.jpg
Leon Payne, Hank Williams, Jerry Irby at the Studewood Club, Houston, circa 1950. Payne wrote Williams' hit, "Lost Highway"; Irby wrote "Driving Nails In My Coffin."
Given the spread and the appeal-to-all-age-groups nature of Rolling Stone's "100 Greatest Country Songs of All Time," the possibility that the list was computer-generated seems more and more likely.

Either that, or Rolling Stone is farming out its country blog to Best in Texas magazine? There are those ever-present, pesky concerns about advertising revenues generated via record labels that need constant cultivation, you know?

How else can the inclusion of Eric Church, Taylor Swift and Kacey Musgraves be rationally explained? In particular, Musgraves' track is so new, how can anyone have had the time and reflective distance to pronounce it a classic on par with tunes like "Night Life" or "Mama Tried" yet?

Actually, it looks like a hook in the water -- or an olive branch? -- for the Americana Music Association crowd. But be it human- or cyber-generated, the list has other glaring problems, not the least of which is that a reader has to click on 100 different pages to view it all.


More »

Rolling Stone's Ridiculous Top 100 Country Songs: The First Half

Cashmural-0620.jpg
Tim Patterson via Flickr
What would Johnny Cash think?
In further efforts to reassure us that it is still relevant, Rolling Stone magazine recently started a country clickbait section called most cleverly (drum roll, maestro) RS Country. I know, the heart pitter-patters in anticipation.

A brief perusal of the site finds basically the same crap, errr... nuts and bolts of most music blogs: lists out the ass. The most recent list that generated beaucoup clicks, errr...intelligent, thoughtful discussion was their recent mega-list, the "100 Greatest Country Songs of All Time."

They actually didn't do too bad a job, as these things go, pieced together as they are like Dolly Parton's "Coat of Many Colors." But the list didn't even make it through the first ten songs without tripping up on their own set-up blurb, which states a great country song has "twang you can feel down to the soles of your feet."

Pure poetry, huh? Those country folks over at Rolling Stone are pretty quick with their descriptions.


More »
Loading...