Meet the McFadden Brothers, Houston's EDM Accountants

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Ryan (L) and Kyle McFadden, a.k.a. Kyle Dux
I once wrote here how my kids work at being musicians. Their hand-to-mouth life demands and modest success mean they don't have to bus tables for a living.

But many Houston musicians do work for the man. Admirably, they create and perform music by night, then do the day job. For many, it's changing tires at the auto shop or stocking shelves at Guitar Center.

Or, in the case of the McFadden brothers, Kyle and Ryan, it's the staid corporate work of accounting. Over the past year, these honest-to-Pete siblings have joined forces to create original, Houston-based electronic dance music. Under the banner of Kyle Dux -- yes, that's a nod to Bloodsport's larger-than-life hero, Frank Dux -- they focus on house music and hope to help advance a local EDM scene that seems too small for a city this large.

REWIND: Yes, My Musician Kids Have Jobs. They're Musicians.


According to Ryan, it surprises some people when they share their musical pursuits.

"There's such a stereotype with accountants," he says. "You think of accountants as very straitlaced bean-counters, crunching these numbers. I guess we take that to a different extreme after 5 o' clock."

Kyle writes the songs and older brother Ryan is the sound engineer, mastering the music Kyle sends him to make it production-quality.


They agreed to discuss their musical ambitions one night after work, but they work together by day, too. Both McFaddens are accountants for a multifamily property management company, who over Mexican food told us how this all fell into place. We had to time-travel back to junior high school for the origins of Kyle Dux, which was a quick trip, since our margaritas were strong.

"I got into rap in junior high," Kyle says. "I wanted to be a rapper really bad."

He's interrupted by Ryan's machine gun of laughter, but it doesn't faze him.

"I did! I thought I could be a rapper. I was really into [Dr. Dre's] Chronic 2001; I was listening to it all the time," Kyle adds. "I thought, 'I could be a rapper.'"

He began the tale of how he tried to rap in his advanced Speech 3 class back in the day, and all Ryan can add is, "You were in Speech 3?"

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Kyle says he formed a crew that was "horrible," one that devised a gambling racket that got them all suspended from school. However, they'd already swindled more than $100 from classmates to fund enough studio time to produce a single track, which they posted to Kazaa. Their song? A dis on the class of 2005 from the 2004 graduates.

Gangsta.

It was a basis for the DIY ethic of self-producing music. Kyle's interest in rap was a natural step away from house and he started listening to artists like Bad Boy Bill and Daft Punk. But school and career came first. Once he began to realize some professional aspirations, he returned to music.

"To me, accounting is so uncreative," offers Kyle. "If you're going to be a creative accountant, you're probably going to wind up in jail. I have to get a fix in another way."


Story continues on the next page.


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26 comments
bioenrd22
bioenrd22

These guys are probably Jesse Senejas's coke dealers. "Bro!  I'l totally write a story about you *snort*"


riotgrl
riotgrl

palm meet face. face meet palm

djNIMBUS
djNIMBUS

I'm gonna need HP to do their due diligence and learn what house music is ( exhibit A is the PUMP UP THE VOLUME DOCUMENTARY below or above ), and then compare what is claimed to what is actual. EDM, techno and the 40 shades of HOUSE MUSIC are not the same, nor interchangeable. 

Google / Facebook / Twitter / Youtube / Soundcloud / Mixcloud / Podomatic are you easiest ways to get information.  Considering a lot of us dj's who do play HOUSE MUSIC on a regular basis locally and abroad are well connected, you would think they and you would be familiar with us and what we do here. 

Some us internationally known, some of us local celebrities,.... so, between the two extremes, to say, a non-existent house scene... bogus!

Anyone claiming their favorite house artists are Daft Punk, DeadMaus and Swedish House Mafia is not very exposed to HOUSE MUSIC. Can we say Eeeeee Deeee eeeeM??


I knock no man's hustle, but be educated about your craft and don't devalue the work of those who actually doing what you claim to be doing.


If credibility is a thought, ask those making comments who they are, and I am sure they will tell you. Google us. I am dj NIMBUS. Search any of the afore mentioned social networks for music.... welcome...to the matrix!

marketing106
marketing106

is this article a joke? cause my career started in houston... back in the late 80's early 90's and houston was one of the top 3 cities for house music in the u.s. the people this article is about r a fuckin joke and who ever wrote this owes the houston edm scene and the dj's who have put houston on the global edm map an freakin apology... totally irresponsible reporting... this writer should be fired... these cats r the weakest link to the houston edm scene...

icreatemiracles
icreatemiracles

yalls shit is weak. bunch of faggery. AND your favorite music is the top 40 of house music. try spouting some real shit. fucking daft punk wtf. stardust. wtf ......what about the mitsubishi commercial that you heard, bro. get out of houston.

lando77
lando77

This article is trash and insulting to the Houston underground music scene. Rather than insult the scene these two Accountants are trying to break into, maybe they should support it, go to some shows, meet other DJ's, Promoters and Producers who make the Houston scene thrive instead of insulting it and comparing it to a Deadmau5 Festival that they went to in Canada. 


And to @chuyelcucuy Please do a little research before you print garbage like this, you insulted a community you know nothing about. 


BTW It take more that a Cracked copy of Fruity Loops to call yourself a producer, you guys should really be embarrassed for trying to present yourselves before you are ready. 

Ben20characters
Ben20characters

"I'm not going to say there's not a [house] community here; I'm just going to say I haven't found it," says Kyle.

Seriously? F you Kyle. You have no idea what you are talking about. No house community in Houston? Do your homework. You have two house/techno legends coming to Houston THIS month! Plus, if that clip is a example of what you produce, you are not making house music. That is some straight up cookie cutter crap. period. 


Way to to Houston Press. Lazy. 

aus10m
aus10m

Lol. Amazing. Sounds like it was produced on a iPad.

_sid.
_sid.

According to this article, the McFadden brothers are completely out of touch with the 'house music scene' in Houston and the Houston Press did not do their homework.

Houston has three of the longest running reoccurring EDM parties in the USA; bringing in top 25 acts for over long before they are on the charts. In fact, your beloved Calvin Harris played one eight years ago. as had Gareth Emery.

Maceo Plex, the number #1 ranked house DJ in 2014 sold out his 2012 show, just this weekend Darkside sold out Fitzgerald and then DJ'd an afterhours set until 4am, Resident Artists acts appear monthly in one of the ten re-occuring monthly parties around town; and locally at least 10 producers/DJs have had residencies in NY, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Chicago and San Diego and play at some of the largest festivals including ULTRA, have had mixes ranked in the top 15 on Beatport, sets in the top 20 on soundcloud and have been played on BBC 4, Sirius/XM and other global EDM radio shows.

Lets keep the Bro's, Wii DJ Heros and fist pumpers out of the scene... its better that way.

In fact, WhyTF do I even know about it.

Sid Jacobson
Sid Jacobson

Hahahahahahaha. Shhhh. Don't tell them where the house music scene is. We don't need any bros and fist pumpers.

2t0ne
2t0ne

Keep on doing what you do guys! Houston is a great place to get started in this business. Drive and devotion to even reach out and be brave enough to share your music with our city is a great start. 

vortex9878
vortex9878

is this what passes for blog journalism these days? "edm" puff pieces about wannabe producers who actually have a real day job....i know, i was shocked too! its really all too common. unfortunately it seems the blogger here has no general knowledge of the houston dance scene, notice i didnt say "edm", ugh, anyways, and somehow found these guys, they dont even have a facebook wtf? i hope the next article, print or otherwise related to houston's dance scene actually has some depth and finds a better story that 2 producers who just downloaded fruity loops demo edition that like to add and subtract  :/

triggerbitch
triggerbitch

god, the tracks included in this article sound really dated and overly simplistic. basic knowledge of something as simple as Garageband can produce more interesting results.

Shannon Demny
Shannon Demny

Never heard of these cats before now. They don't have to go very far to find edm enthusiasts in this town. Not sure where they are looking but we're here dudes...

lando77
lando77

@djNIMBUS  I am more disappointed that these 2 Accountants had the nerve to insult Houston's Underground without even knowing of its existence. If they want to go and spin some records at some bar in the Woodlands, that's all them, but to dis 30 years of Houston House music because of some show they saw in canada...with Deadmau5.

I hope they realize how stupid they look. 

jesse281
jesse281

@vortex9878  Thanks for reading the article. And thank you also for not considering "blog journalism" an oxymoron.  


I'll keep in mind next time that the commonly-used reference "EDM" seems either offensive or just goofy to readers who are serious about dance music. One thing I do want to say is these guys contacted me and promoted their music, which is ambitious and smart. As you point out, one doesn't have to be a person with "a real day job" to do that, but if you don't  attempt to share your story no one can tell it. I've been writing for Rocks Off for nearly a year and they were the first EDM act to contact me directly to promote anything -- their music, a show, anything. 


But, I would like to do more and so, regarding the next "dance music" article with a "better" story with "some depth," I am open to suggestions. If your pitch is at least as good as two characteristically different brothers who bonded over music, whose professional careers and secondary musical pursuits are extremely disparate, who are involved in a tech-heavy genre but take a DIY approach to what they do, then feel free to PM me on Twitter, @chuyelcucuy  and let's do this.

bradgroux1
bradgroux1

@triggerbitch  Not to mention, no DJ in their right mind is going to mention Daft Punk and Stardust as their go-to tracks "classic" tracks. That should have been the first flag for our "journalist."


Why? Because that is like asking a rock musician what their go-to tracks are and they say "I Wanna Hold Your Hand" and "A Day in the Life" by the Beatles and "Blowing In The Wind" by Dylan. Well, no shit Sherlock. Those are amazing tracks. Those are literally go-to tracks for everyone with any taste in music.

bradgroux1
bradgroux1

@lando77 @djNIMBUS  Don't blame the two "DJs." They are simply amateurs doing what they think will get them exposure. It is the job of the "reporter" (I use that term extremely loosely) to vet the claims made by those he is writing about. Ten minutes of searching and he would find that there is a booming dance music scene in Houston - and that these guys aren't anywhere near the level of talent to break into it.


The fault lies on the Houston Press. 

bradgroux1
bradgroux1

@jesse281 @vortex9878  God forbid a journalist actually goes and seeks stories, rather than have them land in their lap via a cold-call. Head out to one of any 20 bars, lounges and clubs Wednesday to Sunday nights - only there will you find Houston's "EDM" scene. 


You weren't looking for the roots of Houston dance music. You were looking for a feel good story that serves up as perfect click-bait. Like the brothers in this article, you simply didn't try to find the enthusiasts in town - you simply wanted to give the illusion of effort. 

bradgroux1
bradgroux1

@CoryGarcia If you want to talk to some of the most well-versed dance music fans and DJs in Houston I suggest heading to the Davenport Lounge on Richmond on Sunday nights. Sit there, and talk to people. That place is the epitome of the Houston dance scene, a huge melting pot of passionate people debating and discussing the latest tracks, trends and acts - all while planning their recording sessions for the next week and then planning which venues to hit the following weekend.


I'm far from a dance music aficionado, but I have and learn a ton every time I visit the Dav. I've befriended countless Houston DJs just by sharing a cocktail with them. I think that is why this article was so polarizing in the Houston Dance community (good page views for you I suppose). There are several places just like the Dav every single night in Houston - you don't have to actually look for it. One trip to a popular bar, lounge or club for a big show and you'll know about all the best residencies in the area. It doesn't take any real investigation.


You have DJs that have been in the Houston scene for 10-20 years, working 5-7 days a week producing, spinning and promoting - traveling the world and playing in the biggest venues. And the Houston Press, the "progressive" Houston paper runs a puff piece about two guys that are clearly amateurs in hobby mode. If you want to write an article about that? Go right ahead, but don't come here and say that these guys are ready to make a splash in the dance music scene - when they are clearly clueless that one even exists.

CoryGarcia
CoryGarcia moderator

@bradgroux1  Is there a Houston drum and bass scene, and if so where can I find it? =)

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