Z-Ro: An Even Darker Version of Drake

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Drake catches plenty of slack for being "emotional." It's an odd thing. Some of hip-hop's brightest moments have come from a place of catharsis and authenticity. When considering the Drake discography, it wouldn't come as a surprise if the word Drake was actually Latin for "catharsis" and "authenticity."

With that considered, Houston's own Z-Ro and the No. 1 Nothing Was the Same rapper bear a lot of similarities. Both have perfected the sing-rap flow and are intensely brooding characters who tend to treat the listener like a recommended therapist -- except you're really the one shelling out cash for these sessions.

Z-Ro and Drake are analogous characters in rap. Drake is an uplifting emotional figure who digs up old wounds from a place of triumph. Z-Ro is a gloomy figure who speaks to a dejected soul and taps into present melancholy. A large portion of Z-Ro's music grazes over a present introspection of struggle, whereas Drake's content derives from retrospective thoughts of perceived hardship.

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"Started From The Bottom" takes us back to Drake's troubles as a young adult in Toronto. Here -- not that it completely matters -- it is important to note that as a youngun Drake was a child star, but this is Canadian television and he was the breadwinner for himself and his disabled mother. During the bridge toward the song's end, Drake sings "fuck a fake friend, where your real at?", a message that people can be snakes in the grass that rumbles through his monotone schoolgirl-chantish crooning.

A similar sentiment is found at the start of Z-Ro's first verse on "One Deep," where he proclaims "don't have to come around my way, 'cause I don't want another fair weather friend with a trick up his sleeve." Both rappers express trust issues with those telling lines and are an indicator of their parallel mindsets. However, the surrounding content of the songs reveal where and why they differ from one another. "One Deep" is Z-Ro's cynical manifesto, an oft-expressed philosophy of being able to do bad all by himself. Z-Ro finds solace in his solitude.

"Started From The Bottom," though, is a victory lap, where Drake decides to bring his whole team along for the ride. He's being triumphant, hence why he decides to reveal that he "wear[s] every single chain even when I'm in the house," a telling line about both his vanity and a realization of clamoring onto a tangible representation of success.

Z-Ro, a hometown hero, hasn't found a wild amount of success outside of Texas. If he had a Sprite commercial at some point, he too might say ridiculous thing in song like Drake. However, he's still making music in his backyard. He's still in sync with the reality that most of us live in.


Story continues on the next page.

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3 comments
DQUEEN
DQUEEN

DRAKE LIKE Z-RO??? LMAO, SINCE WHEN??? DRAKE IS A HALF-WHITE CANADIAN WHO IS JUST A RAP "TREND" AND TAKES BEATS FROM CLASSIC HOUSTON RAPPERS AND PRESENTS THEM AS HIS OWN. HE HAS NEVER HAD ANY HARDSHIPS COMPARED TO Z-RO. HE IS NOTHING BUT A FRUIT ROLL-UP : )

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