The Five Most Disappointing Goth Albums: Siouxsie and the Banshees, The Rapture

Categories: Gothtopia

All this week we're going to look back over albums from undeniable goth icons and talk about their failures.

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By the time Siouxsie and the Banshees released The Rapture in 1995, they had been together for almost two decades. They'd blazed a path with a dark and daring sound that still had just enough pop to entice two generations of spooky youngsters, and you will never for a second find me saying that Siouxsie and Steve Severin should be considered anything other than two of the most important names in goth composition.

But their final, 11th album remains a total mess. Even for a band that was always known for tackling a lot of different angles on their records there is an incredibly fractured feeling that you can't get past.

Part of it is that the band was pretty clearly staying together at that point because they were, commercially speaking, a very successful live band in the mid-'90s. They'd been a major act in the first Lollapalooza, and were enjoying the fruits of a long and productive career, even if they never seemed terribly comfortable with that label. Both Siouxsie and Severin said in interviews around that time they didn't consider themselves either old or iconic.

Rewind:

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You'd think that having John Cale produce and album would be the absolute best thing to wed those two points back together, but it wasn't enough. I know many goths who scream that Cale should not have been allowed anywhere near the record, but the songs that he produced are honestly not in any significant way different than the work of the band on their own. Having said that, not much good comes of splitting up your album under two creative forces in two different time periods as they did, something that contributes heavily to the dissonance.

Which is sad because taken individually many of the tracks on Rapture are perfectly awesome. "Fall From Grace" for example is Siouxsie in her most eloquently melancholic. The song has all the earmarks of a great Banshees number, what with her stream of consciousness and somewhat violent lyrics over an almost night club progression.

Or you could look at "Sick Girl," which is a rarity in the banshees catalog in that Budgie wrote the lyrics. You might remember it from a pretty neat scene in a pretty awful movie called The Craft. It's an unnerving little tune that harkens back to Juju. If there's anything that the Banshees had been missing lately it was the ability to disturb, their contribution to Batman Returns notwithstanding.

Rewind:

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8 comments
jigsaw1973
jigsaw1973

I love The Rapture album and song. You reference Sick Child but call it sick girl, I love this song. Forever is amazing. Her lyrics are better than most other bands. I think this article is a bit lazy. Siouxsie would never call herself Goth anyhow.

jigsaw1973
jigsaw1973

I love the rapture, you don't have a clue.

jigsaw1973
jigsaw1973

I love the rapture, you don't have a clue.

jigsaw1973
jigsaw1973

I love the rapture, you don't have a clue.

jigsaw1973
jigsaw1973

I love the rapture, you don't have a clue.

Marcus A. Owen
Marcus A. Owen

I loved this article. I couldn't agree with you more. Looking forward to tomorrow's entry! Who will be on the chopping block?!

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