Five Great Violent Hip-Hop Songs (for Lupe Fiasco)

Categories: Dig This

Lupe Fiasco Marco Torres.jpg
Photo by Marco Torres
Lupe Fiasco used to be a talented, socially conscious rapper known for putting out really good hip-hop albums.

Since he hasn't done one of those in a while, he's more well known these days for criticizing President Obama and espousing conspiracy theories about 9/11. Recently he was back in the news, this time to criticize hip-hop songs for being too violent.

In his rant, Fiasco admitted that he's made violent music in the past, but criticized those who still make such songs as guilty of contributing to inner-city crime and violence. I'm not going to call Fiasco wrong for making a stand against inner-city violence, but at the same time I think he's exaggerating quite a bit by blaming hip-hop for it.

Hip-hop is no more to blame for crime than heavy metal is, and like heavy metal it never would have been so great without the violent aesthetic. So just for Fiasco's pleasure, here's a few of the best violent hip-hop songs ever made, all of which beat the hell out of listening to "Words I Never Said" jammed out for 30 minutes.

5. Eminem, "Kim"
Eminem shocked listeners everywhere with not only the revealing personal nature of his lyrics, but the extreme violence portrayed in his stories. It was the kind of violence only previously heard in the horrocore subgenre, something that had yet to really take off into the mainstream before Eminem. With Em's ascent to the top of the charts, it made everyone aware of the graphic depictions of murder that existed in the confines of hip-hop.

Yet there was a reason Marshall Mathers made such a bigger splash than his horrocore contemporaries. He displayed a tremendous amount of talent right out of the gate, and his violent lyrics served to convey a twisted, mangled inner-psyche that was struggling to cope with the harsh realities of life and difficult relationships. "Kim" works because, while the violence may all be inside of Em's head, the emotions on full display are real.


4. Jay-Z, "Come and Get Me"
One of Jay-Z's most underrated deep cuts is also one of his most violent, hard-hitting flows. "Come and Get Me" is a stark response to haters who in 1999 were already saying he had sold out after shifting away from the mafioso themes of his first record, Reasonable Doubt. Jay responds challenging them to come and get him; he'll be waiting for them with a glock.

It's also a reflection on how he got to where he was at the time. Not many rappers have worked as hard to get to the top as Jay-Z, nor have they represented as much for other upcoming rappers, and he makes a point of that here. It's a common theme in his music these days, but it was just developing at the time when he still could have turned out to be a flash-in-the-pan success.


3. The Notorious B.I.G., "Warning"
The Notorious B.I.G. Is and was considered one of the greatest rappers of all time. Certainly his music has had a continuing influence on every rapper that has came since. He was also one of the most violent rappers of all time. I really could have picked out any number of his classic tracks for this one ("Gimme the Loot," "Somebody's Gotta Die," "Kick in the Door") but something about "Warning" has always struck me.

"Warning" features an exceptionally funky beat with one of the best basslines in hip-hop history. It's not one of Biggie's most marketable songs despite that. It's a street single if anything. There's no chorus, just one long, amazing verse from Biggie telling a story.

It's impressive on a conceptual level, beginning as a phone call between Big and, erm, himself, discussing some guys who are out to take Biggie down since he's gotten famous. Then it proceeds into the real "warning," a detailed description of exactly how he plans to kill those guys if they really decide to come for him. It's hip-hop storytelling at its finest.


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12 comments
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Hip-Hop also has a wider audience then Heavy Metal.

You can't just straight up say hip-hop has NOTHING to do with inner city crimes, if you do you're a fool. 

This article was just made to take shots and for that purpose only, good job dear writer, you have succeeded yet failed even more. I am laughing at you, not with you.

tawabzy
tawabzy

This article was a waste of my time and effort of trying to demonize a rapper. Get owned.

tawabzy
tawabzy

This article was a waste of my time and effort of trying to demonize a rapper. Get owned.

MadMac
MadMac topcommenter

Thank you, now I can perfectly picture "glib." BTW:

1 Lupe Fiasco is a child flailing for an identity and I doubt he'll have a label in another year

2 "Glock" is proper noun

3 Folk did listen to to Biggy/Tupac's raps and took notes--both were murdered in ambush

4 Jay-Z and Eminem were both charged with violent felonies--without the money, Shawn Carter and Marshall Mathers would have caught convictions--like a lot of CHILDREN who took rap as gospel

5 The relationship between 15-25 year males and domestic assault can be directly tied to environment, history, and culture--Hip-Hop is the soundtrack of violence against women

CoreyDeiterman
CoreyDeiterman

@MadMac Anything could be the soundtrack to violence against anyone. I don't see anybody claiming Nick Cave is responsible for violence because of his Murder Ballads album. Death metal of this decade has advocated far greater violence against women in particular and it's just as popular among 15-25 year old males as hip-hop is, so why is that not to blame? The fact is that if someone wants to be violent toward another human being, the idea is going to come from their own head, maybe from observing other people's relationships, but it's not going to come from music, TV, movies, video games, or anything else.

music2gather
music2gather

@futagostarr @music2gather LISTEN DUMBASS FALL BACK. ur WEAK if you like this WEAK ass paper

MadMac
MadMac topcommenter

My experience is among lower-economic youth--of all ethnicities--passing through the courts. While there are many additional socio/economic factors I see a lot more white/AfricanAmerican/Lation kids in the system enwrapped with Hip-Hop than with everything else put together.

CoreyDeiterman
CoreyDeiterman

@MadMac Furthermore, Biggie and Tupac were murdered because they were involved in a brutal feud against each other and were surrounded by violent criminals. They also both had violent criminal pasts. Their lyrics weren't the reason they were killed, their environment was and the environment would have been the same with or without the music. Rappers feud constantly these days and nobody gets murdered because the environment is different now, even if the lyrics are still just as violent.

It's not up to me to decide the matter of Jay-Z and Eminem's court cases, whether they should have been convicted or not, etc. It also has nothing to do with their music and everything to do with their lifestyle and environment, again. Jay-Z allegedly stabbed someone for bootlegging his music. Who's to say whether he did it or not, because he wasn't convicted, but that act definitely was not the result of his or anyone else's lyrical content if he did it. And to paraphrase Charles Barkley, Jay-Z's not a role model and doesn't pretend to be, so if someone wants to copy his alleged actions, that's on them, not him.

I do apologize for the oversight on the word "Glock" however.

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