The Wrong Ones Are Just Right On Deceiver

deceiver album cover.jpg
The end of the world has been on people's minds lately, what with the Mayans apparently penciling in the apocalypse next year and the Rapture rain-checked for October of this 'un. That preoccupation with the end of the world is why we skipped straight to 'Doomsday Transmission" on the Wrongs Ones' new album, Deceiver (Cutthroat Records).

In most of their moments, the Wrong Ones are a textbook punk band. That's not meant as a knock against them, but what expectations you hold in your head when you're told that an album is a punk album will be met within standard parameters when you throw on Deceiver. True, it's a bit angrier than modern punk, and there is a curious lack of artistic difference in that sung vitriol.

When you listen to something like the Anarchitex's Digital Dark Age, as we just finished doing, you are usually aware of the difference between a song's literal meaning and the fact that it is likely just an artistic expression. From time to time on the full on chainsaw tracks from Deceiver, you wonder if that line between art and action might be just a bit perforated with the Wrong Ones. We're going to play it safe and not cut them off in traffic.

wrong ones poster.jpg
Maybe that hazy barrier between worlds real and worlds imagined is what makes "Doomsday Transmission" the stand out track from Deceiver. It's softer, more spoken, and ultimately emptier than the red-line production of the rest of the album. In that regard, it kind of calls to mind "Gimme Danger" from the Stooges' Raw Power, save that the Wrong Ones never turn up the volume.

Instead, they let the call echo out across the wasteland. They beep like an S.O.S. from a plane crash where everyone has long since ate each other. It's a haunting track that we just cannot get out of our head, and in the context of the album it serves as the brief silent interlude that will surely follow the violence of the world's end and the greater violence of the new world's birth. All of it will be bloody and loud, but the pause, the punctuation is what ultimately defines it.

We sat down with singer Jarrett Barger to ask him a bit about Deceiver.

Rocks Off: What makes The Wrong Ones different from other punk bands?


Jarrett Barger: Nothing much. We don't have to write punk, we choose to. It is the music we grew up on, and we like to stay true to ourselves when we can. If three chords turned up really loud can get the point across, then that is what we will use. If people still don't get it, no worries we have more chords, more sounds, more tools of the trade. Before it is over, we will use them all.


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Fitzgerald's

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1 comments
delosangeles
delosangeles

"It's a haunting track that we just cannot get out of our head, and in the context of the album it serves as the brief silent interlude that will surely follow the violence of the world's end and the greater violence of the new world's birth. All of it will be bloody and loud, but the pause, the punctuation is what ultimately defines it."

okay everyone this is fucking great. he is commenting on a moment in time. it's fun to do that in case you have ever tried which i realize refers back to me but otherwise I couldn't appreciate this. JEEZUS. WHO DOES NOT LOVE ROCKS OFF?  

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