Your Musical Word Of The Day: Wainwright

Categories: Whatever

John_Constable_The_Hay_Wain.jpg
John Constable's "The Hay Wain"
Definition: A person who either builds or repairs wagons. It's from two old English words, "waen" meaning "wagon," and "whryta" meaning "worker." You see similar words like playwright, shipwright, and cartwright. Now it's usually a last name.

Use in a sentence: Will the Houston Press cover the cost of hiring a wainwright to construct a suitable transport large enough to hold the amount of pies with which Gerard Way deserves to get hit in the face for sullying the proud names of Bauhaus and Queen by claiming inspiration from them?

Ed. Note: No.

Author's Note. Phooey!

Use in Music: Rufus Wainwright, "Hallelujah"

Shrek_Soundtrack.jpg

"Wainwright" has fallen out of regular use since the wagon industry tanked, but there's always the one and only Rufus Wainwright. His cover of Leonard Cohen's famous "Hallelujah" is undeniably beautiful, but we would still like to give him a very gentle pie to the face for his refusal to pronounce "you" as "ya" and thereby thoroughly ruining the song's rhyme scheme.

Interestingly enough, though, Wainwright's cover appears on the soundtrack for the first Shrek film, it is actually the John Cale version that plays in the movie. Wainwright sings a different Cohen song, "I'm Your Man," in the film itself.


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