Will Mainstream Rap Ever Stop Objectifying Women?

Some rappers happen to be thoughtful, intelligent people. Every Monday that isn't a national holiday, Rocks Off will have some of them here discussing issues relevant to
their culture.

Knights-of-the-Rap-Table mar7.jpg
Photo illustration by John Seaborn Gray
This Week's Panel: Bun B, Lil Flip, D-Risha, Renzo, Kyle Hubbard, Doughbeezy, Brad Gilmore

Not Invited: Kanye West's affinity for corpses

This Week's Prompt: Kanye's "Monster" video was banned by MTV, apparently because some activists said it portrayed women in a negative light - not all that surprising for a rap video - and its use of sexy corpses implicitly glamorized the brutalization of women (still not that surprising). So, the question is this: Will there ever be a way to have mainstream hip-hop that does not deaden morals towards women?

Bun B: Well yes, but no one buys or supports that music on radio, video, shows or concerts more than women. Not girls... women.

Rap Round Table: So then there's really no reason to aim for that? Monetarily, we'd guess not. But is there some type of intellectual high ground we should all try to ascend to anyway, despite the fact that it might not be necessary?

BB: Of course, but the objectification of women is not just in hip-hop. It's a societal issue. Hip-hop is just an easier target.

RRT: Bingo. So it's an extension (actualization) of a larger, more fundamental issue, which essentially makes it indistinguishable then?

BB: To me, it's about authenticity. The problem is the fake pimps, ballers and thugs in hip-hop/rap that blow up and misrepresent us.


Lil Flip: In life, you meet great women and some are trash. So if a rap song addresses trash, a great woman shouldn't be offended by it. But in my new [music], I spend more time uplifting or people to handle life like grownups. I'm not a role model, I just a play a model's role.


D-Risha: Okay, you have a two-part answer to this. I'ma keep it to the point.

First of all, as many aspiring rappers that pop up on a daily basis, there are aspiring models who don't have what it takes but want the attention/fame and would jump at the chance without a thought of being exploited.

Secondly, sex is big business for hip-hop and it's too lucrative for it. In my opinion, the moment it will slow down is when the women who buy the records stop and the publicist/manager of said artist wakes up for themselves.

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13 comments
waxwoucher
waxwoucher

The Reduction of child sex and clothing sexy girl in the described the lives of children and their children's exposure to sexual music videos.Sexualization also reflects itself through TV output video and materials, including music on the Internet, Regulatory agencies and the media as the main channel of complaints. It is impact profound, including eating disorders and self justification of sex offenders.

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Gary Packwood
Gary Packwood

Oh Good Grief, Lil Flip.

God does not make trash.

Edith Stone
Edith Stone

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Common Sense
Common Sense

I think everyone is trying to pass the buck. Mainstream hip hop objectifies women to a degree that is far beyond what you see in mainstream movies or rock videos.

Halfwit
Halfwit

Sure we could argue degrees, I can't disagree with that. They definatly over seasoned the recipe to a point where it is hardly edible.

Jake
Jake

Think of it this way - Rock music has a much longer history than rap and plenty of rock artists still objectify women (Buckcherry). So in a word, - no.

Oh Puh-leeeez
Oh Puh-leeeez

Name one rock song that refers to women as bitches, hoes, or tricks. I'll wait...

Halfwit
Halfwit

He already did, the band Buckcherry had a hit song where they literally said "Hey, you're crazy bitch". The kids loved it.

Ram
Ram

hold up... mtv plays music videos?

Halfwit
Halfwit

I agree with the panel here, mainstream rap music uses the same recipe of sex, drugs, and rock & roll as ....well rock & roll. So its all party, women, drugs, money, repeat. Women have been working on gaining ground on the testosterone battle field for ages, but just as you can still see scantily clad women dancing behind a man in a music video, you can still see some scantily clad woman being saved by a man in your next action blockbuster whose only line will basically be “Do me now”. I think I do remember a time in hip-hop where women had pulse to the artist; that might come back one day…

Duh
Duh

I would invite anyone who thinks hip-hop could ever NOT be offensive to women go back and listen or read the lyric's to hip-hop legend NWA's "Just Don't Bite It".

Ram
Ram

How is that song offensive... ? People are too damn sensitive

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