HERO's Arch-Nemesis, the Alliance Defending Freedom

notoero-thumb-500x500.jpg
Photo by Aaron Reiss
It's no coincidence that the City of Houston, Mayor Annise Parker, City Attorney David Feldman and company asked for any communication between the five local pastors and Alliance Defending Freedom (other parts of the subpoena were likely ill-advised, but that's neither here nor there) when they sent out that controversial subpoena that has been getting so much attention. After all, the ADF is a religious right organization dedicated to opposing LGBT rights the way the rest of us are dedicated to breathing and love of the Beatles, so if ADF lawyers have been advising local pastors on how to repeal HERO, that would certainly be worth knowing.

But what exactly is the ADF? The organization, formerly known as the Alliance Defense Fund, was created in 1994 by group of high-profile activists from the religious right, including including James Dobson, founder of Focus on the Family and Bill Bright, founder of Campus Crusade for Christ.

The group operates with a budget of more than $30 million, an army of more than 2,000 lawyers who adhere to ADF principles, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. They specialize in legal work where they believe that religious freedom is being violated, though of course "religious freedom" only entails the views of those who agree with ADF. Basically these people see themselves as the anti-ACLU, a group that they contend has been working to promote "an anti-Christian, pro-abortion, pro-homosexual agenda on the Body of Christ in Europe, Canada, Latin America, and elsewhere," according to the ADF website.

More »

Why Moving Pride out of Montrose Is a Big Deal

gayprider2560.jpg
Photo by Julian Bajsel
Social media went haywire last week when Pride Houston announced that next year's Houston LGBT Pride Celebration will take place downtown, leaving its Montrose home of more than three decades.

Many were shocked because they weren't told this was happening ahead of time. And while there have been grumblings for years that Pride might have outgrown the Montrose, very few people appear to have known that this would be the year Pride Houston finally pulls the trigger and relocates.

On Facebook, people posted photos of old "PomPom" shirts ("People Opposed to Moving Pride out of Montrose"). JD Doyle, a grand marshal in last year's parade, wrote: "As the Pride Committee did not solicit community input regarding the decision, it is extremely difficult for us to make a reason judgment on it. Knowing how controversial this would be, they took that from us."

More »

Reminder: DPS Will Not Recognize Name Changes From Same-Sex Marriages

samesexmarriageimage.jpg
Max Burkhalter
Last year, after Connie married her partner of nine years in California, she took her wife's surname, legally changing her diver's license and Social Security card to Connie Wilson. Legally speaking, she is Connie Wilson.

When work required that Wilson and her partner move from California to Houston with their three kids this summer, she knew the State of Texas wouldn't recognize her marriage. What she didn't know is that she couldn't keep her name.


More »

The Daily Show Pitches a New Name for Rice University

DailyShowRice560.png
Nobody wants anything to do with Ray Rice just now. Go figure, beating your significant other to the point she's knocked unconscious will tend to cause public opinion to go sour. Eventually. At least once TMZ gets hold of a tape of the beating and it is plastered all over the media and is so embarrassing that even the NFL can't ignore it anymore. In case you've been living under a rock, Rice was bounced from the Baltimore Ravens. Finally. He even lost his Nike deal. Anyways, people are turning in their Ray Rice jerseys, and demanding their money back and all that sort of thing.

While everyone is avoiding all association with all things Rice, The Daily Show's Jon Stewart had some suggestions about some brand-protecting changes that could be made. Specifically, "Rice-a-Roni" could become "Simmered Grain-a-Roni." He also had a suggestion for a certain rather prestigious college around these parts.

More »

Five Reasons to Give HPD Funding for Body Cameras

Houston_Police_Department_patch.JPG
HPD
Houston Police Chief Charles McClelland is asking City Hall for $8 million to equip 3,500 police officers over three years in order to arm HPD officers with small body cameras in a bid toward police transparency.

The push for department-wide body cameras is an expansion on a pilot program that began last year, in which 100 HPD officers were fitted with the devices during the test run. The so-called body cameras clip to the front of officers' uniform shirts and are capable of recording both video and audio of police encounters while on duty.


More »

Texas Among the Worst for Gender Equality

wallethub.jpg
WalletHub

Let's talk about gender (in)equality, shall we?

In 2013, the U.S. failed to make the top 10 -- or even the top 20 -- of the World Economic Forum's list of the most gender-equal countries. And we're guessing that little issue is, at least in part, because of the big ol' state of Texas.

A recent study from WalletHub ranked Texas 47 out of all 50 states for gender equity because, according to the data, Texas is near the bottom when it comes to how states treat women.

More »

Meyerland Hipster Church Courts Impossible Demographic

zeteo.jpg
Photo by Susan Du
Kathy McDougall, Angie Boudreaux, Jenni Fairbanks, Earl Fairbanks and Jackie Brown gather for a fellowship dinner at the Fairbankses' house.

Angie Boudreaux grew up in her grandmother's conservative Southern Baptist church an odd child who loved going every week just to hear the preacher preach. Eventually, she became a Sunday school teacher and made her living helping young girls read the Bible.

It would have been a straightforward story, except a super-awkward thing happened to Boudreaux at the end of high school. After much internal wrangling over whether hanging out with lesbians all the time was just something that jock girls did, Boudreaux had to admit she had fallen in love with her best friend, another woman.

She cried, she prayed and others prayed with her, but she stayed gay. Some years later, when church leadership found out, they told her she couldn't be trusted with teaching children.

Jackie Brown is not gay. But after college, when she tried to reconnect with Christianity, a church leader called her an adulteress for living with her then-boyfriend (now husband). It didn't help that she was then barred from singing in the church choir because she also sang at a bar on weeknights.

"The church didn't pay me," Brown said. "The bar did."

The Rev. Jenni Fairbanks was quick to interject that her church hired Brown precisely because of her professional experience. "She logged her hours," Fairbanks said with a shrug.

More »

Bikers, Skateboarders Tug of War Over Skate Park

SkatePark560.jpg
Despite 78,000 square feet of ramps, rails, pipes and pyramids, Houston skateboarders believe the city's newest skatepark still isn't big enough to share with BMXers.

Spring Skate Park currently stands at Kuykendahl and Rankin as America's largest statepark. Opening day last week drew huge crowds of eager skateboarders, many of whom have traveled from out of state just to careen and crash over the park's beautiful concrete slopes.

Yet as skateboarders made use of the free facilities, bikers loudly protested their exclusion. Spring Skate Park won't allow cyclists to share the space, citing safety concerns over mixing four-wheelers and two-wheelers even though skateparks the world over have traditionally allowed both groups.

More »

Sheriff's Deputy Sues Over New HCSO Social Media Policy

dislike-thumb-560x182.jpeg
If you're a Harris County Sheriff's Office employee, good luck sticking to the new restrictions put in place by the HCSO higher-ups that dictate what you can and can't post on social media.

Under the new policy, HCSO employees risk disciplinary action if their Facebook or Twitter posts "cause undue embarrassment or damage the reputation of and/or erode the public's confidence" in the sheriff's office. Posts containing any HCSO logos, badges or personal photographs that show employees in HCSO garb or uniform are prohibited without prior approval from a chief. Also: "speech containing crude, blasphemy (sic), negative, or untrue claims about the HCSO and/or any HCSO personnel is forbidden and therefore will be grounds for disciplinary action."

Similarly, HCSO employees now face disciplinary action for any comments on social media that "negatively affect the public perception of the HCSO."

Sound overly broad to you? It does to Harris County sheriff's deputy Carl Pittman, who sued Harris County Sheriff Adrian Garcia in federal court Monday over the 15-page policy implemented by HCSO last month. Pittman argues in his lawsuit that HCSO's new policy is chock-full of language that unlawfully curtails employees' First Amendment rights to free speech.

More »

Open Carry Texas Says It Still Wants to March in the Fifth Ward

OpenCarry560.jpg
Photo by Teknorat
This weekend marked the second time Open Carry Texas planned to march in one of Houston's historically African American neighborhoods. And, for the second time, the Open Carry Texas folks called it off.

Why? Well, things got pretty ugly last week when representatives of the Fifth Ward, led by Quanell X, head of the New Black Panther Party in Houston, and representatives of the Houston branch of Open Carry Texas, led by David Amad, sat down to hash things out. The original plan was to hold a rally to encourage people in the historically African American neighborhood to get armed and do some of that gun-toting stuff that is so near and dear to the hearts of those in the Open Carry movement. Amad says he sees the rallies a way of encouraging African Americans to exercise their Second-Amendment rights to carry guns. The problem is many representatives of the Fifth Ward don't exactly see things from that angle.

More »

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

General

Loading...