The Surprising Cost of Renting a House in Eight Popular Houston Hoods

Categories: Surreal Estate

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YouTube screen grab.
The rent is TOO DAMN HIGH!
For nearly two years the Houston housing market has been booming. Home inventories are at all-time lows and the city set a record in July for total houses sold and total value of homes sold. It is no surprise then that rental costs have risen right along with home values. That includes rent houses, a market that has exploded with Houston's growth, particularly among young professionals not ready to settle into a home yet. But, with costs soaring in some of Houston's most desirable neighborhoods, it might be cheaper to buy.

We took a look at eight popular Houston neighborhoods where there were more than 15 current rental properties (that quickly excluded places like Midtown, Upper Kirby and Garden Oaks) that were not exclusively town homes (and not duplexes -- these are whole single-family dwellings), which tend to vary pretty widely in price range (this excluded the entire Galleria area, which is dotted with town homes and homes that rented for as much as $17,000!). What we found were that prices were remarkably high for rent especially considering these are single family homes, not duplexes, that don't include bills or yard maintenance -- nearly all the costs of a typical home, but without the ownership.

To get our numbers, we used Zillow's map tool and approximated general areas inside Houston's city limits with more than 10 single-family rental properties the week of August 15. We made a range from low to high for rental properties in that general area, also providing an approximate median cost for each rental. It is far from scientific, but gives a good idea of the average range of rent for properties in these neighborhoods.


Oak Forest
Price Range: $1,500-$3,000
Median: $1,750

One of the fastest selling neighborhoods in Houston is also its largest. The near north side neighborhood is massive and constantly bustling with construction crews remodeling, building and demolishing homes. But it is also a hot area for rental homes, though it is still on the lower end of the spectrum when it comes to living near town.


Spring Branch
Price Range: $2,000-$5,000
Median: $2,000

As renters continue to look for space close to town, this diverse and rather sprawling area along Interstate 10 is booming, as are home rental prices with some going well over $4,000 per month.


Houston Heights
Price Range: $1,500-$3,500
Median: $2,500

Perhaps the most popular place for young professionals who still want a yard, the Heights has exploded in the last 20 years and is now one of the most sought after neighborhoods for buyers and renters alike. While the range here is narrower than in some hoods, owing to the generally modest size of homes available, it continues to be a competitive area for anyone wanting to call it home.


Timbergrove
Price Range: $2,000-$4,000
Median: $2,600

The Heights' smaller, younger neighbor has some remarkably pricey rental properties with half a dozen eclipsing $3k per month. The larger lot size and moderately bigger homes probably account for the difference between it and the Heights and makes a good alternative for those trying to get an 008 zip code.



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16 comments
Jonah Menzies
Jonah Menzies

"Also the state spending is approximately the same as California." Despite the fact that CA has a much higher population, unless you refer to spending per capita, which would actually undermine your original bullshit assertion (despite it being false, nonetheless). Once again....DWEEB.

Jonah Menzies
Jonah Menzies

"Americans are unable to have discussions about emotional topics without becoming defensive and emotional." Internet DWEEB speak for "only those that agree with me are mature adults."

Mathew Burnstein
Mathew Burnstein

Thats true. Texas is comparetively higher than other states. Also the state spending is approximately the same as California. Property Lowest: Louisiana - 0.18% Hawaii - 0.26% Alabama - 0.33% Delaware - 0.43% West Virginia - 0.49% South Carolina - 0.50% Arkansas - 0.52% Mississippi - 0.52% New Mexico - 0.55% Wyoming - 0.58% Highest: New Jersey - 1.89% New Hampshire - 1.86% Texas - 1.81% Wisconsin - 1.76% Nebraska - 1.70% Illinois - 1.73% Connecticut - 1.63% Michigan - 1.62% Vermont - 1.59% North Dakota - 1.42% Cost of k-12 education per year = 8k-13k Cost of keeping a prisoner = 18k-21k Cost of keeping death row = 42k Income California - 7.50% Indiana - 7.00% Mississippi - 7.00% New Jersey - 7.00% Rhode Island - 7.00% Texas - 6.25% Americans are unable to have discussions about emotional topics without becoming defensive and emotional.

Jonah Menzies
Jonah Menzies

Fail. Texas is amongst the highest in overall property and sales tax rates compared to other states. All that TX really has against much of the rest of the country is the lack of state income tax, and that really does not have much effect on the real estate market. Also, higher numbers of those receiving public assistance is the RESULT -- not CAUSE -- of the rising costs of living in other states. Ignorant little DWEEB.

Lorena Salazar Sankey
Lorena Salazar Sankey

I don't live in Houston but south of I-10 in Katy. My husband and I are saving to buy our own home but our rent has skyrocketed and it's getting harder to save because of rising rents. Additionally, there's very little inventory to purchase and what's available is becoming out of our reach financially. I've been forewarned by my landlord that my rent will increase another $250 when I renew. Sadly, everywhere else is the same.

currentlyvince
currentlyvince

Anyone surprised by the Energy Corridor/Memorial being on this list hasn't seen a recent list of Houston ZIP codes ranked by median household income....

jberlat1
jberlat1

Guess what. You can't afford to live in every part of town. Go to the burbs if that is what you can afford. Most can't afford to live in San Francisco, so they live out in the burbs.Most can live in Manhattan, so they live in Queens.Living in town isn't a constitutional right.

Mathew Burnstein
Mathew Burnstein

No they are not cheap. WIsh the rest of the country would adopt Texas financial practices of low taxes and low welfare so people would stay in their home states instead of moving here.

Anse
Anse

@jberlat1 Let us remember this when the city council considers some ordinance that sets the peanut gallery all a-flutter. Historic districts, anyone?

h_e_x
h_e_x

@jberlat1 Same thing was said when redlining was the norm.

h_e_x
h_e_x

Does this low tax scheme apply to property taxes, which are quite high?

jberlat1
jberlat1

@h_e_x redlining has nothing to do with the supply and demand of rental houses. Nobody is obligated to lower rents based on what the applicant can afford. Nobody is talking about discrimination, but if you can't afford the rent, move further out. 

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