Are These the 10 Worst Houston High Schools? (UPDATED)

Categories: Education

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Photo by Alberto G.
The school rankings relied heavily on STAAR test results.

Updated 5/5: Late last week the Houston Chronicle reported that the Children at Risk findings used flawed statistical analysis.
"The mistake involved a 'growth index' as part of each school's ranking. The measure of how much individual students improved on state exams in reading and math from 2012 to 2013 was based on an inaccurate formula. Some results may have been off by decimal places while others had a bigger variation.

Original:

This week the nonprofit group Children at Risk released their annual school rankings, which look at the Texas Education Agency to rank 7,000 schools. By their own admission, Children at Risk's analysis has its flaws.

"The limitations posed by TEA data are valid criticisms for the school ranking system. Any erroneous data reported to or by TEA may have an effect on the rankings," the group said in a statement accompanying the rankings.

So what does that mean? Take it all with a grain of salt. Here are the 10 worst schools that all received an F letter grade, according to Children at Risk.

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Houstonisd.org
10.) George Cameron Scarborough High School

This northwest Houston architecture magnet school ranked 144. It made the dreaded "dropout factory" list seven years ago.

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Photo by Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center
9.) Charles H. Milby High School

This East End high school ranked 146.

8.) Westbury High

This southwest Houston school located in Brays Oaks ranked 147.


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13 comments
michonbb
michonbb

Children at Risk is a lobby group for HISD, and its "researchers" get paid to spin stats and present less-than-favorable information about schools like the ones on the list.  I appreciate the opinions of the other people who posted, but anyone who is not informed about the  politics of schools that serve Black and Brown children, should reserve their judgement. I am surprised that the Houston Press has not conducted a more thorough investigation of TEA data and statistics re: these "failing" schools. I am sure that if that work were done, the greater-Houston area would be surprised and disgusted to learn just how deep this rabbit hole goes. 



Jessica Castro
Jessica Castro

In my honest opinion. I went to wheatley High school. and it is not bad as people make it seem the teachers here work hard and they actually Make learning. Very fun unlike. Some high schools they are more worry about having high ranks and having the best students and wheatley has always made education exciting for student I don't think they should. Be on the worst. School list.

Christina Martinez
Christina Martinez

I went to Wheatley and yes, sadly I agree! This is why I hate how HISD forces you to go to the school you're zoned to, I think it's ridiculous!! Just because I lived in a bad neighborhood doesn't mean I didn't want the option to be able to go to a good school, all because of zoning!

Sophia Clovee
Sophia Clovee

Or worse are you teaching at one of those schools?

Robert Lee
Robert Lee

My mother tried to send me to three of those schools. I told her no I'm either going to St. Johns or Bellaire (which use to be a great school).

mmehrizi
mmehrizi

These Schools have been going downhill since the mid 80's. So the list really isn't all that surprising.

disappointed
disappointed

I am the father of three graduates of one of the better-rated HISD high schools.  One of my sons is a mathematics teacher at one of your article's "ten worst high schools."  All three of my sons are college graduates, and all are gainfully employed and/or seeking graduate degrees. After just two years of teaching at one of the "ten worst high schools," my son is leaving HISD to teach at one of the nearby suburban school districts.  Why?  (1)  He wants to help his less fortunate students to overcome their socioeconomic challenges, but most of them do not want to do the schoolwork and homework necessary to succeed.  (2) The families of his students rarely support the strong relationship between education and success in life.  At parent-teacher conferences, he is lucky if ten parents/grandparents/uncles/ aunts/legal guardians show up out of his 120 students. (3) All the administration cares about is standardized test scores.  "Teaching for the test," is NOT the same as teaching to provide an education that will help the students succeed in life and/or college.  (4) Horrific administrative burdens that are not present at most of the nearby suburban school districts. 

MadsenV
MadsenV

Equality of opportunity in action

EdgarSinodeng
EdgarSinodeng

Actually there are ways to get into other schools, BUT if you don't get into a magnet program you'll need to take the METRO

EdgarSinodeng
EdgarSinodeng

@disappointed "All the administration cares about is standardized test scores.  "Teaching for the test," is NOT the same as teaching to provide an education that will help the students succeed in life and/or college."

If you want the admins to stop, have it so schools are NOT penalized for low test performance but the state. It's simple, very simple. The problems are even higher up in the food chain.

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