Some Stuff You Need to Know About Pit Bulls

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Photo by Tony Alter
He has no idea how much negative press he gets.
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In April, a tug-of-war over the fate of a pit bull in Montgomery County came to a happy end: noted dog trainer Cesar Milan agreed to take the dog, Gus, on the condition Gus never again step paw in Texas.

Gus had seriously injured a rescue group volunteer named Amber Rickles, who'd been watching him. County officials planned to euthanize the dog, but the rescue group, Maggie's House, along with an animal welfare legal assistance group called the Lexus Project, petitioned for a reprieve.

The news came on the heels of another pitbull-related story that made headlines around the world: in League City, a courageous mother bit off the ear of a pit bull that attacked her two-year-old daughter.

The same week, police in Kaufman said two pit bulls killed an 85-year-old woman in her home.

Four months earlier, two pit bulls were euthanized after police said they tore apart a 43-year-old homeless woman.

A year before that, in Conroe, a four-year-old boy hopped his backyard fence into his neighbor's yard, where, police said, a pit bull mauled him to death.

It's possible to come to the conclusion, based on these reports, and the myriad other pit-bull mauling news stories that regularly make headlines, that pit bulls are vicious killing machines with a tendency to flip out and attack for no apparent reason. That certainly seems to be the position of groups like DogsBite.org, which are sometimes cited as reputable sources by the media.

Too often, other factors -- how an owner's nature may have contributed to the dog's nature, say -- are ignored for the sake of a superficially simple story. This reinforces pit bulls' reputation as savage beasts -- quite the opposite of these dogs' image in the first half of the 20th century. So what happened?

Jake Flanagin, writing in Pacific Standard, describes it rather eloquently: "The pit bull's trademark loyalty combined with its muscular physique made it a prime candidate for exploitation. The breed quickly came to represent aggression and a perverse idea of machismo, thus becoming the preferred guard dog cum status symbol for drug dealers and gangsters. Popularity for the breed in low-income, urban areas exploded." This led to "an epic puppy-boom" centered "predominantly [in] low-income areas," making pit bulls "arguably one of the least-responsibly cared for breeds in the country."

(It's important to note that "pit bull" is not a proper breed title, but an umbrella term for Staffordshire bull terriers, Staffordshire terriers, American pit bull terriers, and bull terriers -- or any combination thereof).

Flanagin articulately stated what Hair Balls, somewhat less intellectually, always called The Scumbag-Dipshit Axis. Generally, if you graphed the plot points and players in a pit bull attack, there's a strong possibility that the pit bull would be plotted conspicuously close to either a scumbag or a dipshit. Typically, the chief scumbag or dipshit in each scenario is either the dog's owner or a parent of a victim, but not always.

The Scumbag-Dipshit Axis can of course be applied to any dog attack situation, it's just mostly applied to pit bull-related bites, because, to the detriment of society as a whole, scumbags and dipshits are drawn to pit bulls more than just about any other dog. If the preferred canine companion of scumbags and dipshits everywhere were dachshunds, then we'd probably be reading a lot about vicious wieners. And those bites would probably require, at most, a Band-Aid.

So we thought we'd take a look at some of the misunderstood or mythologized aspects of pit bulls. In the spirit of full disclosure, Hair Balls is a pit-bull owner, and has friends and acquaintances who also own pit bulls. None of these dogs have ever eaten anyone's face. Not coincidentally, these dogs are rarely -- if ever -- in the orbit of scumbags or dipshits. So we're definitely biased -- not in favor of pit bulls, but against S's and D's. We just want to make that clear.


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80 comments
williampolk75
williampolk75

all dogs bite. pit bulls are great pets. the people who have the type of pit bulls who attacked these people are irresponsible dog owners. i've had 12 pit bulls at one time and not one of the have ever growled at me. why? because i treat them as i want to be treated. with respect and love. pit bulls are not for everyone.

bendoverkma
bendoverkma

Why the Bad Rap?


Sadly, the pit bull has acquired a reputation as an unpredictable and dangerous menace. His intimidating appearance has made him attractive to people looking for a macho status symbol, and this popularity has encouraged unscrupulous breeders to produce puppies without maintaining the pit bull’s typical good nature with people. To make matters worse, irresponsible owners interested in presenting a tough image often encourage their pit bulls to behave aggressively. If a pit bull does bite, he’s far more likely to inflict serious injuries than most other breeds, simply because of his size and strength. A pit bull bite is also far more likely to draw media attention. Many dogs of other breeds bite people, but these incidents almost always go unreported. They’re just not exciting enough fodder for television and print.


Despite this bad rap, a well-bred, well-socialized and well-trained pit bull is one of the most delightful, intelligent and gentle dogs imaginable. It is truly a shame that the media continues to portray such a warped image of this beautiful, loyal and affectionate breed. Pit bulls once enjoyed a wonderful reputation. Some of the most famous dogs in American history were pit bulls. A pit bull named Stubby, a decorated hero during World War One, earned several medals and was even honored at the White House. During duty, he warned soldiers of gas attacks, found wounded men in need of help and listened for oncoming artillery rounds. Pit bulls have been featured in well-known advertising campaigns for companies such as Levis, Buster Brown Shoes and Wells Fargo. The image of a pit bull, which was considered a symbol of unflagging bravery and reliability, represented the United States on recruiting and propaganda posters during World War One. Many famous figures, including Helen Keller, President Theodore Roosevelt, General George Patton, President Woodrow Wilson, Fred Astaire and Humphrey Bogart, shared their lives and homes with pit bulls.


Modern pit bulls can still be ambassadors for their breed. Some are registered therapy dogs and spend time visiting hospitals and nursing homes. Some work in search-and-rescue. Tahoe, Cheyenne and Dakota, three search-and-rescue pit bulls from Sacramento, California, worked tirelessly at the World Trade Center during the aftermath of 9/11. Others, like Popsicle, an accomplished U.S. customs dog, work in narcotics and explosives detection. Still others serve as protection or sentry dogs for the police. The majority are cherished family members. Pit bulls become very attached to their people, and most love nothing better than cuddling on the couch or sleeping in bed with their pet parents (preferably under the covers)!

bendoverkma
bendoverkma

Living with Dogs: What's Important?

When it comes to living and working with dogs, the concept of dominance is largely irrelevant. This may come as a surprise to many dog owners. The truth is, when working with dogs that have a training or behavior issue, the goal of the dog professional is to develop a behavior modification or training plan that will address the problem at hand. This generally does not require understanding a dog's motivation and emotional state, but rather focuses on what the dog is doing (behavior), and what we want the dog to "do," helping the dog understand how to perform the desired behaviors and then rewarding him for doing so.


Far too many times dog owners have been given advice to "show the dog who's boss" and "be the alpha." The unfortunate side effect of this thinking is that it creates an adversarial relationship between the owner and their dog with the belief that the dog is somehow trying to control the home and the owner's life. Such misinformation damages the owner-dog relationship, and may lead to fear, anxiety and /or aggressive behaviors from the dog. Dogs cannot speak our language and they can find themselves thrust into situations in our homes that they find difficult to comprehend, by owners trying to behave as they mistakenly believe "alpha" wolves do.


Rather than dominance, it is most often a lack of clear interspecies communication that leads to behaviors we find troubling. It is the human's responsibility to teach our dogs the behaviors that we find appropriate, and reward them when they do the things we like. Just as importantly, it is our role to show them which behaviors are not appropriate in a constructive and compassionate manner that does not lead to further anxiety on the dog's part.

bendoverkma
bendoverkma

Does Breeding Impact a Dog’s Behavior?

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By Nicole Pajer


Over the years, domestic dogs have been bred to showcase certain appearances. Through this process of selective breeding, a variety of breeds —from the tiny Chihuahua to the towering Great Dane — have been created. According to a recent study, selective breeding of domestic dogs not only alters the way a dog physically looks, but also drives major internal changes in canine brain structure.

Scientists from the University of New South Wales and the University of Sydney conducted a one-of-a-kind study, which revealed that in the process of breeding domestic dogs, the position of the canine skull has shifted as well. This is a result of humans selectively breeding for different skull lengths to create various breeds.

To determine this, Michael Valenzuela from the University of New South Wales and a team of researchers performed MRI scans on the brains of two English springer spaniels, as well as eleven euthanized dogs, which were donated to the study by a local pound. The batch of donated dogs included a range of breeds, such as an Akita cross, mastiff cross, Staffordshire bull terrier, Shih Tzu cross, greyhound, Maltese, Jack Russell terrier, Australian cattle dog, and a pit bull mix.

The MRI brain scans revealed that the dogs with the shortest skulls — the Shih Tzu cross, pit bull mix, and Akita — showed a significant reorganization of the location of the brain through breeding. In these short-snouted breeds, the cerebral hemispheres of the brain were rotated forward by up to 15 degrees. In addition, the brain’s olfactory lobes, which work to process smell, had shifted position in these breeds, moving from the front to near the back of the skull. According to Valenzuela and his team, the brains of these short-snouted dogs do not sit inside the skull cavity in the same manner as the brains of longer nosed dogs, whose brains appear to be closer to those of the domestic dog’s early wolf ancestors.

Valenzuela says the study reveals “strong and independent correlations between the size and shape of a dog's skull, brain rotation and the positioning of the olfactory lobe. As a dog's head or skull shape becomes foreshortened — more pug-like — the brain rotates forward and the smell centre of the brain drifts further down to the lowest position in the skull.” The study’s co-author, University of Sydney associate professor Paul McGreevy, stated that the study’s findings strongly suggest that one dog’s world of smell may be very different than another’s, and that this change alone could affect how domesticated dogs perceive their environments. The authors noted that this might in fact alter a dog’s personality and behavior, and they encourage people to be responsible when selectively breeding dogs.

Valenzuela and McGreevy plan to conduct future research as to how exactly these changes in canine brain positioning affect a dog’s brain function and what the impact is on its behavior.



Read more: http://www.cesarsway.com/training/socialization/Does-Breeding-Impact-a-Dogs-Behavior#ixzz38utBT26Q

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

Abstract

Journal of the American Veterinary Medical AssociationDecember 15, 2013, Vol. 243, No. 12, Pages 1726-1736doi: 10.2460/javma.243.12.1726
Co-occurrence of potentially preventable factors in 256 dog bite–related fatalities in the United States (2000–2009)Did you know your can participate in the US Powerball lottery? (Lottoneto)Gary J. PatronekVMD, PhDJeffrey J. SacksMD, MPHKaren M. Delise;Donald V. ClearyBAAmy R. MarderVMDCenter for Animals and Public Policy, Department of Environmental and Population Health, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536. (Patronek); Sue Binder Consulting Inc, 3958 Preston Ct NE, Atlanta, GA 30319. (Sacks); National Canine Research Council, 433 Pugsley Hill Rd, Amenia, NY 12501. (Delise, Cleary); Center for Shelter Dogs at the Animal Rescue League of Boston, 10 Chandler St, Boston, MA 02116. (Marder)

The National Canine Research Council supported the efforts of Karen Delise from 2006 to 2011 for assembly of case reports and data abstraction and Kara Gilmore, JD, for assistance with data abstraction and validation from case reports.

Donald Cleary is Director of Communications and Publications at the National Canine Research Council and Treasurer of Animal Farm Foundation, parent organization of the National Canine Research Council.

Presented in part as an oral presentation at the AVMA Annual Convention, Chicago, July 2013.

Address correspondence to Dr. Patronek (gary.patronek@tufts.edu).

Objective—To examine potentially preventable factors in human dog bite–related fatalities (DBRFs) on the basis of data from sources that were more complete, verifiable, and accurate than media reports used in previous studies.

Design—Prospective case series.

Sample—256 DBRFs occurring in the United States from 2000 to 2009.

Procedures—DBRFs were identified from media reports and detailed histories were compiled on the basis of reports from homicide detectives, animal control reports, and interviews with investigators for coding and descriptive analysis.

Results—Major co-occurrent factors for the 256 DBRFs included absence of an able-bodied person to intervene (n = 223 [87.1%]), incidental or no familiar relationship of victims with dogs (218 [85.2%]), owner failure to neuter dogs (216 [84.4%]), compromised ability of victims to interact appropriately with dogs (198 [77.4%]), dogs kept isolated from regular positive human interactions versus family dogs (195 [76.2%]), owners’ prior mismanagement of dogs (96 [37.5%]), and owners’ history of abuse or neglect of dogs (54 [21.1%]). Four or more of these factors co-occurred in 206 (80.5%) deaths. For 401 dogs described in various media accounts, reported breed differed for 124 (30.9%); for 346 dogs with both media and animal control breed reports, breed differed for 139 (40.2%). Valid breed determination was possible for only 45 (17.6%) DBRFs; 20 breeds, including 2 known mixes, were identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Most DBRFs were characterized by coincident, preventable factors; breed was not one of these. Study results supported previous recommendations for multifactorial approaches, instead of single-factor solutions such as breed-specific legislation, for dog bite prevention.

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zeffpitts

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“Pit bull” is not a breed, but a “type” that encompasses several registered breeds and crossbreeds.  Therefore, statistics that claim “Pit bulls” are responsible for some percentage of attacks are lumping many separate breeds of dogs together, then comparing those statistics to other dogs that are counted as individual breeds.  There are currently 25 breeds that are commonly considered a “pit bull”.

Myth:  Pit Bulls or Pit Bull type dogs are human aggressive by nature.

Fact:    Studies by the Center for Disease Control have proven that no one breed of dog is inherently vicious. The CDC supports the position that irresponsible owners, NOT breed, is the number one cause of dog bites.

Myth:   Pit Bulls or Pit Bull type dogs are inherently vicious.

Fact:     No more vicious than Golden Retrievers, Beagles, or other popular “family” dogs.  In a recent testing done by The American Canine Temperament Testing Society (ATT), pit bulls achieved a passing rate of 83.9%, passing 4th from the highest of 122 breeds. That’s better than Beagles, passing at 78.2 and Golden Retrievers passing at 83.2%.  The average passing rate for ALL breeds is 77%.

Myth:   Pit Bulls or Pit Bull type dogs are responsible for most fatal dog attacks.

Fact:     From 1965 – 2001, there have been at least 36 different breeds/types of dog that have been involved in a fatal attack in the United States. (This number rises to at least 52 breeds/types when surveying fatal attacks worldwide).

When dog bite statistics are taken into consideration versus the population, “Pit Bulls” come in at the BOTTOM of the list.

Registered Population

# of Reported Attacks

Breed

% vs. Population

  Approx.  240,000           12  Chow Chow  .005%  Approx.  800,000           67  German Shepherd  .008375%  Approx.  960,000           70  Rottweiler  .00729%  Approx.  128,000           18  Great Dane  .01416%  Approx.  114,000           14  Doberman  .012288%  Approx.  72,000           10  St. Bernard  .0139%  Approx. 5,000,000           60  Pit Bulls   .0012%

Regardless what the media would like us to believe by their “selective” reporting, the FACTS are what matters. There is no denying them.  Pit bull and Pit Bull “type” dogs are no more dangerous than any other breed. The fact is that their overall temperament is more stable and people friendly than that of most other breeds. It is time to stop believing the hype and educate yourself on the truth.

Canine Genetics and Behavior

By Glen Bui, American Canine Foundation

“To state that a breed of dog is aggressive is scientifically impossible.  Statistics do not support such a finding.  Dogs have been domesticated for thousands of years and within all breeds there can be dangerous dogs because of owner issues such as training the dog to attack, lack of training and socialization.

There is no such thing as the “Mean Gene” in dogs as well as in people. However, mutant genes have been discovered.  Alteration of a single DNA base in the gene encoding an enzyme called monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) has been found to render the enzyme nonfunctional.  This enzyme normally catalyzes reactions that metabolize the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and  oradrenaline.  What this does is cause slight mental impairment which interferes with the ability to cope with certain situations resulting in aggression.  There is no proof and there never has been that the American Pit Bull Terrier possesses mutant genes.   There is a one in ten thousand chance of a mutant gene appearing in a population.

Aggressiveness has many definitions and its stimulus of the environment that causes behavior.  Dogs defend territory, they exhibit dominance and if allowed can become protective of their family.  All this behavior can be controlled by the owner and aggression is mainly an act of behavior.  To make claim that the American Pit Bull Terrier can cause more severe injury than other breeds is ludicrous.  Over 30 breeds of dogs are responsible for over 500 fatal attacks in the last 30 years, every victim was severely injured.  The American Pit Bull Terrier is clearly a useful member of society.  The breed was World War One Hero and it’s rated as having one of the best overall temperaments in the United States (A.T.T.S.).  The breed is used for dog show competitions, therapy, service work, search and rescue, police work and companionship.  Man has domesticated dogs to the point they serve as companions, workers and even objects of beauty. Dogs will protect man, see for him, hunt for him and play.  One breed is not more inherently good or evil, vicious, harmful or helpful.  It is man who is responsible for the dog’s behavior, not the breed of dog.  Those passing breed bans fail to understand that a mis-trained Pit Bull can be replaced with another breed.  People determine whether dogs will be useful members of a community or a nuisance.  It is the people who allow their dogs to become dangerous and legislators must control and punish the people.” 


Organizations Against Breed Specific Legislation:

  • American  Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)
  • The American Kennel Club (AKC)
  • The United Kennel Club (UKC)
  • American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA)
  • American Temperament Testing Society (ATTS)
  • National Animal Control Association (NACA)
  • Maryland Veterinary Medicine Association
  • Humane Society of the United States (HSUS)
  • American Canine Foundation (ACF)

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

petMD has had some long and spirited discussionsabout dog breeds and human attacks by dogs. Many contributors to the discussion rightly pointed out the lack of reliable data surrounding this issue. Yet the political answer to the situation is always breed specific legislation (BSL). In other words, ban the ownership or restrict the activity of specific breeds alleged to be involved in human attacks. Municipalities persist with this narrow focus despitestudies that indicate the ineffectiveness of these programs.

The results of a 10-year study recently reported in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association sheds further light on the complexity of this issue. It identifies preventable factors that are far more significant than breed.

The researchers examined the data from 256 dog bite-related fatalities in the U.S. between the years 2000-2009. They generated the following statistics for factors involved in the fatal attacks:

  • In 87% there was an absence of an able-bodied person to intervene
  • 45% of the victims were less than 5-years old
  • 85% of the victims had only incidental or no familiarity with the dogs
  • 84% of the dogs were not neutered
  • 77% of the victims had compromised ability (age or other conditions) to interact appropriately with dogs
  • 76% of the dogs were kept isolated from regular positive human interactions
  • 38% of the dog owners had histories of prior mismanagement of dogs
  • 21% of the dog owners had a history of abuse or neglect of dogs
  • In 81% of the attacks, four or more of the above factors were involved
  • 31% of the dog breeds differed from media reports
  • 40% of the dog breeds differed from both media and animal control reports
  • Only 18% of the dogs had validated (DNA) breed identification
  • 20 breeds and 2 known mixed breeds were represented in the attacks

These statistics indicate that most of the factors surrounding dog-bite related fatalities are preventable and unrelated to dog breed.

The first statistic shows the obvious lack of supervision in these attacks. Responsible dog and victim parental or caretaker supervision most certainly could have prevented the majority of these deaths.

73% of the dogs were chained or isolated in fenced outdoor areas or indoor areas. Only 15% of the dogs were allowed to roam. Nearly three-quarters of the attacks occurred on the dog owner’s property. Restricting access to these areas could prevent many attacks.  

Interestingly, 67% of the older victims that were deemed compromised were under the influence of drugs or alcohol, another preventable circumstance. Only five of the victims were compromised due to Alzheimer’s, dementia, or uncontrollable seizure disorders.

The reporting errors in this study are also disturbing. Fatal dog attacks are always media sensations and heavily reported. Yet we can only trust that 60% of the reports of breed identification from the media and involved animal control officials are accurate. And unfortunately, it is media reports rather than facts that spur the political decisions that lead to breed specific legislation. Based on this study, 20 breeds and 2 mixed breeds should face legislation rather than the few that are presently targeted.

The ugly truth about this study is that it points to human behavior as the cause of dog attacks on humans. Social responsibility cannot be legislated. Many of these dog owners had histories of animal mismanagement, yet the penalties or consequences were inadequate to change the behavior. It would have been interesting if the study had also looked at previous behaviors and histories of the parents of the young victims.

Whether programs for responsible pet ownership, bite prevention education, or dog related parent supervision education are widely effective has yet to be proven. Certainly breed specific legislation is not the answer. A recent Canadian study showed that there were no significant differences in the number of bite related hospital visits before and after communities adopted breed specific legislation.  

Dr. Ken Tudor

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

Today, the APBT is still used (underground and illegally) as a fighting dog in the United States; pit matches also take place in other countries where there are no laws or where the existing laws are not enforced. However, the vast majority of APBT's--even within the kennels of breeders who breed for fighting ability--never see any action in the pit. Instead they are loyal, loving, companion dogs and family pets. One activity that has really grown in popularity among APBT fanciers is weight pulling contests. Weight-pulls retain something of the spirit of competition of the pit fighting world, but without the blood or sorrow. The APBT is ideally suited for these contests, in which the refusal to quit counts for as much as brute strength. Currently, APBTs hold world records in several weight classes. I have seen one 70-lb. APBT pull a mini-van! Another activity that the APBT is ideally suited for is agility competition, where its athleticism and determination can be widely appreciated. Some APBTs have been trained and done well in Schutzhund sport; these dogs, however, are more the exception than the rule (see the section on APBT's and protection/guard work).

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

Since 1936, due to different breeding goals, the American Staffordshire Terrier and the American Pit Bull Terrier have diverged in both phenotype and spirit/temperament, although both, ideally, continue to have in common an easy-going, friendly disposition. [2] Some folks in the fancy feel that after 60 years of breeding for different goals, these two dogs are now entirely different breeds. Other people choose to view them as two different strains of the same breed (working and show). Either way, the gap continues to widen as breeders from both sides of the fence consider it undesirable to interbreed the two. To the untrained eye, ASTs may look more impressive and fearsome, with a larger and more blocky head, with bulging jaw muscles, a wider chest and thicker neck. In general, however, they aren't nearly as "game" or athletic as game-bred APBTs. Because of the standardization of their conformation for show purposes, ASTs tend to look alike, to a much greater degree than APBTs do. APBTs have a much wider phenotypical range, since the primary breeding goal, until fairly recently, has been not to produce a dog with a certain "look" but to produce one capable of winning pit contests, in which the looks of a dog counted for nothing. There are some game-bred APBTs that are practically indistinguishable from typical ASTs, but in general they are leaner, leggier, and lighter on their toes and have more stamina, agility, speed, and explosive power.

Following the second World War, until the early 1980s, the APBT lapsed into relative obscurity. But those devoted few who knew the breed knew it in intimate detail. These devotees typically knew much more about their dogs' ancestry than about their own--they were often able to recite pedigrees back six or eight generations. When APBTs became popular with the public around 1980, nefarious individuals with little or no knowledge of the breed started to own and breed them and predictably, problems started to crop up. Many of these newcomers did not adhere to the traditional breeding goals of the old-time APBT breeders. In typical backyard fashion they began randomly breeding dogs in order to mass produce puppies as profitable commodities. Worse, some unscrupulous neophytes started selecting dogs for exactly the opposite criteria that had prevailed up to then: they began selectively breeding dogs for the trait of human aggressiveness. Before long, individuals who shouldn't have been allowed near a gold fish were owning and producing poorly bred, human-aggressive "Pit Bulls" for a mass market. This, coupled with the media's propensity for over-simplification and sensationalization, gave rise to the anti-"Pit Bull" hysteria that continues to this day. It should go without saying that, especially with this breed, you should avoid backyard breeders. Find a breeder with a national reputation; investigate, for example, the breeders who advertise in the breed's flagship magazine, The American Pit Bull Terrier Gazette. In spite of the introduction of some bad breeding practices in the last 15 years or so, the vast majority of APBTs remain very human-friendly. The American Canine Temperament Testing Association, which sponsors tests for temperament titles for dogs, reported that 95% of all APBTs that take the test pass, compared with a 77% passing rate for all breeds on average. The APBT's passing rate was the fourth highest of all the breeds tested.

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

The immediate ancestors of the APBT were Irish and English pit fighting dogs imported to the States in the mid-19th century. Once in the United States, the breed diverged slightly from what was being produced back in England and Ireland. In America, where these dogs were used not only as pit fighters, but also as catch dogs (i.e., for forcibly retrieving stray hogs and cattle) and as guardians of family, the breeders started producing a slightly larger, leggier dog. However, this gain in size and weight was small until very recently. The Old Family Dogs in 19th century Ireland were rarely above 25 lbs., and 15-lb. dogs were not uncommon. In American books on the breed from the early part of this century, it is rare to find a specimen over 50 lbs. (with a few notable exceptions). From 1900 to 1975 or so, there was probably a very small and gradual increment in the average weight of APBTs over the years, without any corresponding loss in performance abilities. But now that the vast majority of APBTs are no longer performance-bred to the traditional pit standard (understandably, since the traditional performance test, the pit contest itself, is now a felony), the American axiom of "Bigger is Better" has taken over in the breeding practices of the many neophyte breeders who joined the bandwagon of the dog's popularity in the 1980s. This has resulted in a ballooning of the average size of APBTs in the last 15 years--a harmful phenomenon for the breed, in our opinion. Another, less visible modification of the breed since the 19th century was the selective intensification of genetically programmed fighting styles (such as front-end specialists, stifle specialists, etc.), as performance breeding became more sophisticated under competitive pressures. In spite of these changes, there has been a remarkable continuity in the breed for more than a century. Photos from a century ago show dogs indistinguishable from the dogs being bred today. Although, as in any performance breed, you will find a certain lateral (synchronic) variability in phenotype across different lines, you will nevertheless find uncanny chronological continuity in these types across decades. There are photos of pit dogs from the 1860s that are phenotypically (and, to judge by contemporary descriptions of pit matches, constitutionally) identical to the APBTs of today.

Throughout the 19th century, these dogs were known by a variety of names. "Pit Terriers", "Pit Bull Terriers", "Half and Half's", "Staffordshire Fighting Dogs", "Old Family Dogs"(the Irish name), "Yankee Terriers"(the Northern name), and "Rebel Terriers"(the Southern name) to name a few. In 1898, a man by the name of Chauncy Bennet formed the United Kennel Club (UKC) for the sole purpose of registering "Pit Bull Terriers" as the American Kennel Club wanted nothing to do with them. Originally, he added the word "American" to the name and dropped "Pit". This didn't please all of the people so later the word "Pit" was added back to the name in parentheses as a compromise. The parentheses were then removed from the name about 15 years ago. All other breeds that are registered with UKC were accepted into the UKC after the APBT. Another registry of APBTs is the American Dog Breeders Association (ADBA) which was started in September, 1909 by Guy McCord, a close friend of John P. Colby. Now under the stewardship of the Greenwood family, the ADBA continues to register only APBTs and is more in tune with the APBT as a breed than the UKC. The ADBA does sponsor conformations shows, but more importantly, it sponsors weight pulling competitions which test a dogs strength, stamina, and heart. It also publishes a quarterly magazine dedicated to the APBT called the American Pit Bull Terrier Gazette (see the "References" section). The authors feel that the ADBA is now the flagship registry of APBT as it is doing more to preserve the original characteristics of the breed.


zeffpitts
zeffpitts

all these deaths by non pitbull types and breeds, BSL ignores these victims and so do the foamers!

KILLED: Infant killed by a Pomeranian

http://articles.latimes.com/20...


KILLED: Infant killed by a Retriever-

Chow Mix http://alldogsbite.org/2013/08...


KILLED: 2 yr.old girl killed by Great Dane

http://www.unchainyourdog.org/...


KILLED: Infant killed by Golden Retriever

http://retrieverman.net/2012/0...


KILLED: One year old boy killed by Rottweiler 

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


KILLED: Infant killed by Jack Russell Terrier

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


KILLED: Elderly woman killed by a

Cane Corso

http://btoellner.typepad.com/k...


KILLED: A newborn baby killed by

Shiba Inus

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


KILLED: Elderly woman killed by Rottweiler 

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


KILLED: 7 yr. old girl killed by Malamutes

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


KILLED: 13 yr. old boy killed by Mastiff

http://www.northjersey.com/mob...


KILLED: 4 yr. old girl killed by Labrador/Husky mix 

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014...


Golden Retriever attacks boy

http://www.wcnc.com/news/local...


A Labrador and a Rottweiler attack a toddler 

http://www.news.com.au/lifesty...


Dachshund critically injured infant

http://articles.latimes.com/20...


Chocolate Labrador brutally attacks a 6 yr. old girl

http://www.abcactionnews.com/n...


Labradoodle attacks teenage girl

http://www.3news.co.nz/Dog-att...


Cocker Spaniel attacks young girl

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Woman is injured by poodles

http://kdvr.com/2013/07/09/wom...


Toddler mauled by Dalmatian 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_...


An infant is mauled by an Akita

http://www.azfamily.com/home/B...


Elderly man attacked by Greyhounds

http://www.sptimes.com/2007/12...


Young girl attacked by

Australian Shepherd

http://m.walb.com/#!/newsDetai...


St. Bernard-Labrador mix attacks a boy, crippling him

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/a...


13 yr. old boy attacked by

Australian Shepherds

http://www.farahandfarah.com/b...


DirectTV employee seriously injured by German Shepherd Dogs 

http://www.wdrb.com/story/2540...


Black Labrador attacks a 3 year old boy

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new...


A labrador-chow mix attacks an autistic child, completely un-provoked

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Novia Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever bites a toddler's face

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Cairn Terrier mauls a toddler

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new...


2 Mastiffs attack a jogger

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Labrador-Shepherd Mix attack elderly woman

http://www.niagara-gazette.com...


A Samoyed Husky attacks middle-aged woman

http://www.burtonmail.co.uk/Ne...


A 4 year old is nearly killed when a Labrador attacks him

http://www.couriermail.com.au/...


A pregnant woman's lip is nearly torn of when she is attacked by a Rhodesian Ridgeback 

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


A teenager is mauled by a husky

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Toddler's face disfigured after a Jack Russell Terrier attack

http://www.parentdish.co.uk/20...


Teenage boy attacked by Doberman-Shepherd mix

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Leonberger attacks a young girl

http://www.bristolpost.co.uk/p...


Chihuahua brutally attacks a very young girl

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Elderly woman attacked by Husky

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Labrador attacks small boy 

http://www.hometownlife.com/ar...


Desmond Tan was attacked by Golden Retriever

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Akita attacks boy

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Akita attacks a young girl

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Young boy attacked by Black Lab Mix

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Australian Shepherd Mix bites young girl

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Yellow Labrador attacks twice in one month

http://www.1011now.com/home/he...


Japanese Akita brutally mauls toddler

http://www.business-standard.c...


Labrador jumps school fence, attacks a boy

http://www.10tv.com/content/st...

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breed identification by visual inspection—let alone by eye witness reports—is all but useless. That is further demonstrated by the fact that when the breed of a dog involved in an incident is determined by two separate sources, media and animal control, for example, they are often not in agreement. Reliable ID is made in only 17% of cases. “Results—Major co-occurrent factors for the 256 DBRFs included absence of an able-bodied person to intervene (n = 223 [87.1%]), incidental or no familiar relationship of victims with dogs (218 [85.2%]), owner failure to neuter dogs (216 [84.4%]), compromised ability of victims to interact appropriately with dogs (198 [77.4%]), dogs kept isolated from regular positive human interactions versus family dogs (195 [76.2%]), owners’ prior mismanagement of dogs (96 [37.5%]), and owners’ history of abuse or neglect of dogs (54 [21.1%]). Four or more of these factors co-occurred in 206 (80.5%) deaths. For 401 dogs described in various media accounts, reported breed differed for 124 (30.9%); for 346 dogs with both media and animal control breed reports, breed differed for 139 (40.2%). Valid breed determination was possible for only 45 (17.6%) DBRFs; 20 breeds, including 2 known mixes, were identified." http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/abs/10.2460/javma.243.12.1726

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I find it bewildering how the foamers gloss over some facts and leave others right out for instance actual APBT's that were fought in the pits, they didn't spend their days lounging around on the couch, they weren't chained up 24/7 these animals were kept to a strict diet and exercise regime similar to that any sports man/woman would use to maintain fitness and match readiness. They spent long hours running on treadmills and hanging off what they call spring polls which improve their ability to grip, how many family pets engage in such demanding exercise and training, this training is what gave those dogs the explosive power and endurance and strength to grip and compete,once again how many family pitbulls undergo such intense training and exercise regime?? According to foamers all this training and dieting is genetically inbred too?? lol!

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Objective—To examine potentially preventable factors in human dog bite–related fatalities (DBRFs) on the basis of data from sources that were more complete, verifiable, and accurate than media reports used in previous studies.


Design—Prospective case series.


Sample—256 DBRFs occurring in the United States from 2000 to 2009.


Procedures—DBRFs were identified from media reports and detailed histories were compiled on the basis of reports from homicide detectives, animal control reports, and interviews with investigators for coding and descriptive analysis.


Results—Major co-occurrent factors for the 256 DBRFs included absence of an able-bodied person to intervene (n = 223 [87.1%]), incidental or no familiar relationship of victims with dogs (218 [85.2%]), owner failure to neuter dogs (216 [84.4%]), compromised ability of victims to interact appropriately with dogs (198 [77.4%]), dogs kept isolated from regular positive human interactions versus family dogs (195 [76.2%]), owners’ prior mismanagement of dogs (96 [37.5%]), and owners’ history of abuse or neglect of dogs (54 [21.1%]). Four or more of these factors co-occurred in 206 (80.5%) deaths. For 401 dogs described in various media accounts, reported breed differed for 124 (30.9%); for 346 dogs with both media and animal control breed reports, breed differed for 139 (40.2%). Valid breed determination was possible for only 45 (17.6%) DBRFs; 20 breeds, including 2 known mixes, were identified.


Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Most DBRFs were characterized by coincident, preventable factors; breed was not one of these. Study results supported previous recommendations for multifactorial approaches, instead of single-factor solutions such as breed-specific legislation, for dog bite prevention.

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Proponents of breed bans, such as Denver Assistant City Attorney Kory Nelson, instead argue that pit bulls are more dangerous because, when they do bite, the injuries they inflict are more serious. So we looked at figures gathered by the Colorado Department of Public and Environment on hospitalization rates for dogs by county. From 1995 to 2006, more people sought medical attention for dog bites in Denver County than anywhere else in the state. Counties without pit bull bans -- Boulder, El Paso and Jefferson -- showed fewer people going to the hospital dog bites.Are bites from pit bulls more severe?


BiteLevelByBreed_chart.jpg

Bite severity by breed (click to enlarge)

The Coalition for Living Safely with Dogs, a Colorado group made up of veterinary associations and animal welfare groups, gathered information from animal control divisions across the state. Their report found that the severity of pit bull bites -- 1 being a "bruising" and 5 being a "maul (serious bodily injury)" -- was about the same as bites from breeds such as Australian Cattle Dogs and Akitas, and below breeds such as American Bull Dogs, Dalmatians and Dachshunds.

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hat is notable is the significant drop in dog bites of all breeds, from 1,146 in 1990 to 305 in 2008. Animal control officials attribute this decrease in total bites to increased enforcement of Denver's non-breed specific dog laws and county-wide spaying and neutering efforts.

Some studies on dog bites show pit bulls and Rottweilers as inflicting the most reported bites; others show Golden Retrievers, Labs and Chow Chows as causing the most. But is this because these breeds bite more often or because more of these dogs are represented in a given area? Since there's no reliable doggy census, it's nearly impossible to know if one breed bites more often than another. logs.westword.com/latestword/2009/09/3497_dead_dogs_and_other_numbe.php

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Dogs can become aggressive for any number of reasons - fear, dominance, guarding possessions. No matter the reason for the dog aggression, the body language of a dog can let you know if he is about to bite. Knowing what to look for can help you prevent dog bites.

1. Growling and Snapping

Growling and snapping are probably the most obvious signs that a dog is about to bite. Dogs growlor snap to let you know they are unhappy or uncomfortable. If a dog growls or snaps at you when you approach him, it's time to give him some space.

Growling and snapping can be helpful, too. Pay attention to the times your dog growls or snaps. Does it happen when you approach him when he's eating, when strangers approach, or when you touch him while he's asleep? Knowing what elicits the growling and snapping allows you to manage the problem and work on changing the behavior.


2. Wagging Tail

This is one of the signs that many people find surprising. Dog trainers often hear dog owners comment that their dog was wagging his tail right up until the moment he bit someone. But pay attention to the way your dog wags his tail.

A happy dog may wag his tail and get his whole body involved. A dog who is about to bite is usually fairly rigid, and his tail will be pointed high and moving more quickly back and forth. This may be a sign of an impending dog bite.

More Info3. Raised Fur

When dogs are afraid or overly stimulated, you may see the hair on their backs stand up. In some dogs, just the hair on the back of the neck between the shoulders stands up. Other dogs have it at the neck and also near their tails. Still other dogs may have a ridge of hair that stands up down the entire length of their backs. If you notice a dog has his hackles raised, it's a signal that he needs you to back off.

4. Rigid Body Posture

Often when a dog is about to become aggressive, his body language is a dead giveaway - no pun intended. A comfortable, happy dog usually has a relaxed body with his ears low and a happy, wagging tail. An aggressive dog is just the opposite. His entire body may go stiff, and his ears and tail are raised high. If you reach out to pet a dog, and his entire body freezes rather than wiggling to get closer, he is not happy with being touched. It's time to move away to make him more comfortable.

5. Lip Licking, Yawning and Averting Gaze

If you notice a dog is licking his lips (when food is not involved), yawning repeatedly, or turning his head to avoid meeting your gaze, he is trying to tell you something. Dogs engage in these behaviors to let you know they are uncomfortable with something going on around them. For instance, a dog who has never been around children may lick his lips or yawn when a child comes over to pet him. It does not necessarily mean that he is about to bite, but it is a warning that he is not comfortable. A dog who is uncomfortable, afraid, or stressed is more likely to bite. Your best bet when a dog uses one of these appeasement gestures is to try to alleviate his discomfort.

6. Cowering and Tail Tucking

Cowering and tail tucking are more overt signs than lip licking or yawning that you are dealing with a fearful dog. While fearful dogs don't always bite, fear does increase the likelihood. If you encounter a dog who cowers away from you with his tail tucked between his legs, back off. Let him approach you in his own time, and he'll be less likely to feel the need to bite to defend himself.

7. Seeing the Whites of the Eyes

Many dog trainers refer to this as whale eye. You'll see the whites of a dog's eye when he moves his head slightly, but doesn't move his eyes. A half moon of white will show around the dog's eyes. Whale eye is a sign of anxiety in dogs. It's an expression many animal shelter workers are familiar with. Again, this doesn't necessarily mean that a dog is about to bite. It means that a dog is feeling anxious, and anxious dogs are more likely to bite. If you see a dog showing the whites of his eyes, it's a good idea to give him some space until he feels more relaxed.

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It is important to understand the causes of dog bite injuries before you can attempt to think of the preventive measures or ways to at least reduce the bites if not completely stop the bites.

Having discussed the possible reasons why puppies bite we will now be discussing the reasons why dogs bite. However, you must surely know that a biting puppy that’s not taught bite inhibition will almost certainly turn into a biting older dog. Dogs will bite as a result of the following reasons among others.

1. Dominance and Authority

Dogs will bite to establish leadership and order within their rank. They’re being assertive by using their teeth to determine who is the strongest, and will to power are genetic behavior traits which are peculiar to all canine groups. This dominance behavior being demonstrated by dogs is as a result of survival instinct. They feel they are in charge and need to keep other members of their group along without excluding other people, in most cases will be the member of family of the dogowner and neighbors.

2. Warning Message

Dogs usually send warning notes in the form of non-serious bites before any serious attack. If you step over a dog who's resting or try to move a dog off the bed for any purpose you should know what to expect.

3. Security and Protection:

Some dogs feel insecure as a result of some of human actions like invading a dog's territory, riding on his back like pony, showing off with ferocious displays, blowing puffs of air in his face, taking her food or disturbing a mother dog and her puppies. They believe these human actions can cause them harm.

It could also be from being continuously chained. Continuous chaining of dog can cause physiological problem and thus the affected dog may not know how to behave when it's released. So in other to protect themselves, they result to aggressive acts like biting.

4. Lack of good/positive training

Dog bites are a result of the lack of good and positive training. Why do I say this? Some dog owners employ forceful, fear inducing and painful training methods. Your dog will perceive this as threatening their life and result to aggressive acts in order to protect herself.

Others will bite out of fun and when they are over excited. Both cases are mostly as a result of lack of positive training. So if you don’t properly socialize your dog with people or other dogs, expect bites any time.

5. Fear Biting

Just like human beings, if a dog is in any threatening situation they will feel the need to protect themselves. This is often directed toward strangers. Incidents like threatening a dog or its family, bending over it when it's resting, hugging it when it's sleeping, teasing and awakening a dog will surely cause a bite as a response to these actions.

6. Physical Pain

Depending on the degree of pain, a dog will bite a beloved owner, member of the family or neighbors when suffering from physical problems like chemical imbalances in the brain, external infections like otitis, tumor, hip dysphasia among others.

A fighting dog is sure to be in a serious painful condition and attempt to break the fight by pullingthe dog will possibly result in a bite.

How to Recognize Dog Bite Warning Signs

Before any dog bites he will give warning signs which, if apprehended, can prevent a bite at all. They usually make sure that these warnings are very clear using body language whenever they feel frightened or threatened by situations.

It's advisable to watch and listen to the warning signs a dog gives you when he is upset. Let me make it clear here once again that a healthy dog will never bite without being provoked. However, if your dog bites without provocation, seek professional help immediately.

Below are some of warning signs your dog gives which you have to notice:

• When a dog's ears are pulled back against his head.

• When his legs are very stiff.

• When dog's fur is raised up, his ears erect and tail high.

• When a dog growls and barks aggressively with his teeth showing.

• When a dog is intensely looking directly at a human's face.

• When a dog licks his chops while you approach or interact with him.

• When a dog suddenly starts scratching or licking himself.

• When a dog lowers its tail (held stiffly) and wags it slowly.

• When dog is standing forward and up on its toes. (unclear)

• When a dog's body is stiff and leans forward toward the target.

• When snarling with its teeth uncovered.

• When the dog is cowering.

• When a dog’s tail is tucked completely under his body.

• When a dog is ill or old.

• When a dog turns his head away from you.

• When a dog yawns while you are approaching.

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Behavioral differences among breeds of domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris): Current status of the scienceTop 5 low-cost paradisiac places to visit (TopTipsNews)Lindsay R. MehrkamClive D.L. WynneAccepted: March 17, 2014; Published Online: March 22, 2014DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2014.03.005

Abstract

In both popular media and scientific literature, it is commonly stated that breeds of dogs differ behaviorally in substantial, consistent and predictable ways. Since the mid-twentieth century, scientists have asked whether meaningful behavioral differences exist between breeds of dogs. Today, there are over 1000 identified dog breeds in the world, but to date, fewer than one-quarter of these are represented in studies investigating breed-specific behavioral differences. We review here scientific findings of breed differences in behavior from a wide range of methodologies with respect to both temperament traits and cognitive abilities to determine whether meaningful differences in behavior between breeds have been established. Although there is convincing scientific evidence for reliable differences between breeds and breed groups with respect to some behaviors (e.g., aggression, reactivity), the majority of studies that have measured breed differences in behavior have reported meaningful within-breed differences has well. These trends appear to be related to two main factors: the traits being assessed and the methodology used to assess those traits. In addition, where evidence for breed differences in behavior has been found, there is mixed consistency between empirical findings and the recognized breed standard. We discuss both the strengths and limitations of behavioral research in illuminating differences between dog breeds, highlight directions for future research, and suggest the integration of input from other disciplines to further contribute to our understanding of breed differences in behavior.

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Dog breed is commonly discussed in media reports of attacks and, despite the inaccuracies recent research shows these reports often contain, such discussion leads to perceptions that breed is a key factor in the risk of aggression. Is this the case, or is it distracting us from other important factors influencing dog behaviour? While there is little research in this area, what there is suggests the dog’s breed is of little importance.

Good dog, bad dog

At Bristol University, we surveyed dog owners regarding aggressive behaviour in their dogs, such as growling, lunging, barking and biting. We asked about the occurrence of aggressive behaviour in three situations; towards family members, towards unfamiliar people entering the house, and towards unfamiliar people outside the house. From the nearly 4,000 replies, we investigated whether dogs were reported to show aggressive behaviour in more than one situation, and whether the characteristics of owners (such as age) and their dogs (including breed) influenced the risk of aggression in each context.

What we found was that dogs tend not to be aggressive in more than one of the surveyed situations. That is, those that are aggressive towards family members rarely do so towards unfamiliar people, and vice versa. This is important, because it challenges the idea that dogs are either innately vicious, or “man’s best friend”.


https://theconversation.com/dog-aggression-has-little-to-do-with-breed-so-test-the-owners-22015

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10 Things Dogsbite.org Is Trying To Pass Off As Facts

Who They Are

Dogsbite.org is a website dedicated to wiping out the American Pit Bull Terrier and other bully breed dogs. They are on a mission, charged by their leader, a former bite victim, who has little to no expert knowledge in these types of dogs. The website is vast and has a following, however there are numerous "facts" on the site that are questionable at best. Reading through them and doing accurate fact checking shows a pattern that is misleading and down right untrue.

Here are 10 things that Dogsbite.org would like you to believe as being true facts however have no basis or are opinions rather than facts.


1) It's The Breed Not The Deed

For years, the slogan "Punish the deed not the breed" has been yelled, chanted and plastered everywhere when the debate comes up about the dangers of pit bulls. Through admission of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) and the Center for Disease Control (CDC) there is no accurate way to determine if one breed of domesticated dog is more dangerous or prone to attacks as opposed to any other breed.

Also through temperament testing, where properly trained dogs are evaluated, American Pit Bull Terriers scored very well as being suitable pets, with only 5 % showing unprovoked aggression. Compared to Chihuahuas that showed 11 % unprovoked aggression. This does lead us to believe that trained pit bulls are less dangerous then trained chihuahuas and that it is left at the fault of the owner not the dog.

2) A Pit Bull Is Obviously a Pit Bull

There are around 20 different breeds of dogs that have similar physical traits as American Pit Bull Terriers. Many people can't tell the difference between these dogs. Ca De Bou is a Mallorquin Bulldog, not a Pit Bull. Cane Corso breed also has very similar features and by the looks of them, they could fit into the "pit bull type" category but they too are not Pit Bulls. According to the CDC and AVMA the only way to prove or accurately identify a breed of dog is to do DNA testing. Since people don't want to test every dog they see, they will just give a general description like "it looked like a pit bull" or make a guess "it was a pit bull" without actually knowing.

3) Media Coverage is Accurate About Pit Bulls

We all know that you can't believe everything you see or hear on the news. Media coverage isn't always accurate and certainly doesn't do as much as it could to get facts instead of focusing so much on stories. Yes Pit Bulls can inflict massive damage onto a person so when one does it tends to make the news headlines. But what about the poodle that bit a kid over 10 times in the course of a only a few moments and left the child covered in blood? A poodle isn't a controversial as a pit bull. Its been proven that the media will forego stories for better ones or one that will at least stir up the viewers.

4) All Pit Bulls Are Unpredictable

Well this one is true but only to a point. You can not predict what any domesticated or wild animal is going to do in every situation. It is impossible. Every dog has the ability to snap or become aggressive, it all about the environment they are in and how they have been trained. This, though, does not mean they will not bite! Every dog, cat, pet and person is capable of killing something or someone, It doesn't have to be premeditated. To simply say that Pit Bulls are unpredictable is to completely ignore the existence of all other breeds when kept in the context in which DogsBite.org has it.

5) Pit Bulls Don't Pass Any Temperament Testing

Temperament testing with dogs is subjective, it is based on trained dogs. Basic training means that the dog listens to the handler, can walk properly on a leash and understands basic commands such as sit and stay. There is no elaborate doggy boot camp that the dogs have to attend first, just that they be basically trained. Properly trained Pit Bulls do pass basic temperament tests, this means they do not show unprovoked aggression just because they are Pit Bulls. Every breed will have some percentage that shows unprovoked aggression even when trained. Every breed will have some percentage that is not trained and that has severe aggression issues including biting people, attacking other animals, or mauling children. These acts do not pertain only to Pit Bulls. They are universal traits of non-socialized, untrained and not properly cared for dog regardless of breed.


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Great Britain passed nationwide BSL in 1989. The dog bite statistics remained the same. That is indicative that dog bites have nothing to do with dog breeds, but rather with negligent owners.

Responsible Dog Owners of the Western States recognizes that neither “Dangerous” Dog Laws, or Breed Specific Dog Laws protect the public. That is why RDOWS Model Dog Owner Regulations were developed. RDOWS Model Dog Owner Regulations are applied to the human factor in the human/dog equation. Of the two, only the human being has the capacity to understand, and to function to law. Only human beings have rights, and are expected to respond accordingly to the attendant responsibilities that come with those rights.

When legislators focus their legislation on animal behaviors, and mete out punishments to animals, they have taken American juris prudence back to the dark ages. Laws must be written for human beings. We look to the Constitution of the United States as being the foremost authority for laws in these United States. There isn’t one mention of animals, as our founding fathers knew then that animals were, and would always be the property, and thus the responsibility of their human owners. I will attach the letter that I sent to Kory Nelson, and cc’d to Colleen Lynn.

Cherie Graves, chairwoman

Responsible Dog Owners of the Western States

P.O. Box 1406 Newport, WA 99156

http://www.povn.com/rdows

http://www.povn.com/rdows/donations.html

http://rdows.wordpress.com

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/UAOA

http://www.u 

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stories about dog attacks, the recent description of an aggressive "fight dog" that bit a woman on the thigh and elbow in a Superior parking lot prompted many online comments at Denverpost.com.

"Anyone who owns a mutt from one of these killer breeds should be REQUIRED to have 100k in liability insurance," wrote one person. Another poster seethed about seeing more unleashed pit bulls without muzzles in public places: "I used to only carry a weapon to kill pit bulls in cities, and now the situation is only getting worse. Aggressive dogs should all be put down. Peace, Love, and Golden Retrievers!" Despite the fact that the article states very clearly that police listed the dog "as a mastiff or German shepherd mix," several other comments also mention pit bulls in reference to the attack.

Such assumptions aren't surprising. People often use "pit bull" as a synonym for any dog that is hyper-aggressive and dangerous. In hopes of preventing severe dog attacks, Denver has maintained a controversial twenty-year prohibition on any dog that appears to be more than 50 percent pit bull. In this week's story examining how Denver's pit bull ban has performed over the yearsWestword intern Kiernan Maletsky and I spent several months collecting dog bite statistics from Denver and several other metro-area cities with and without breed bans. Click below for some visuals on what we found.

Denver's bites (click to enlarge)First, we looked at the number of bites recorded by Denver Animal Care and Control going back to 1990, the first full year the breed ban was in effect. (Click charts to enlarge.) Aside from a bump in 2004 when enforcement of the ban was temporarily suspended, reported bites from pit bulls in Denver have stayed relatively static -- around twelve per year. What is notable is the significant drop in dog bites of all breeds, from 1,146 in 1990 to 305 in 2008. Animal control officials attribute this decrease in total bites to increased enforcement of Denver's non-breed specific dog laws and county-wide spaying and neutering efforts.

Some studies on dog bites show pit bulls and Rottweilers as inflicting the most reported bites; others show Golden Retrievers, Labs and Chow Chows as causing the most. But is this because these breeds bite more often or because more of these dogs are represented in a given area? Since there's no reliable doggy census, it's nearly impossible to know if one breed bites more often than another.

Bite hospitalizations (click to enlarge)Proponents of breed bans, such as Denver Assistant City Attorney Kory Nelson, instead argue that pit bulls are more dangerous because, when they do bite, the injuries they inflict are more serious. So we looked at figures gathered by the Colorado Department of Public and Environment on hospitalization rates for dogs by county. From 1995 to 2006, more people sought medical attention for dog bites in Denver County than anywhere else in the state. Counties without pit bull bans -- Boulder, El Paso and Jefferson -- showed fewer people going to the hospital dog bites.

Are bites from pit bulls more severe?

Bite severity by breed (click to enlarge)The Coalition for Living Safely with Dogs, a Colorado group made up of veterinary associations and animal welfare groups, gathered information from animal control divisions across the state. Their report found that the severity of pit bull bites -- 1 being a "bruising" and 5 being a "maul (serious bodily injury)" -- was about the same as bites from breeds such as Australian Cattle Dogs and Akitas, and below breeds such as American Bull Dogs, Dalmatians and Dachshunds.Dog bites in cities without bans(click to enlarge)In late 2005, Aurora joined Denver in banning pit bulls. Here's how their average number of reported dog bites stack up against Broomfield, Boulder and Lakewood, which don't outlaw pit bulls.Pit bulls impounded(click to enlarge)

Denver has impounded 5,286 dogs under its pit bull ordinance. In 1992, the third full year of the ban, Denver impounded 27 pit bulls. In 2000, the number increased exponentially until its height of 1,011 in 2005, when animal control began to enforce the ordinance after a one-year moratorium. Last year, 354 pit bulls were impounded.

Pit bulls killed(click to enlarge)The more pit bull that are impounded, the more pit bulls are euthanized. In 2005 and 2006, Denver put 1,453 pit bulls to death. City staff only had euthanization numbers back to 2002. But by applying the impound/euthanization rate to the previous ten years, we estimate that at least 3,497 pit bulls have been euthanized under Denver's ban.

From investigation to impound to euthanization, it costs the city roughly $256 per dog.

The recent case of a Pomeranian that was banned from Aspen shows that any dog breed can be vicious.

Dog attack fatalities (click to enlarge)But which breeds have killed in Colorado? As this list reveals, out of nine reported dog attack fatalities in the state since 1980, pit bulls were responsible for two.

For more information, read the Westwordfeature story on the pit bull ban, view photos from the city's "pit bull row" and check out a sidebar on how the City of Boulder is dealing with aggressive dogs without banning pit bulls.


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Canine Genetics and Behavior

By Glen Bui, American Canine Foundation

“To state that a breed of dog is aggressive is scientifically impossible. Statistics do not support such a finding. Dogs have been domesticated for thousands of years and within all breeds there can be dangerous dogs because of owner issues such as training the dog to attack, lack of training and socialization.

There is no such thing as the “Mean Gene” in dogs as well as in people. However, mutant genes have been discovered. Alteration of a single DNA base in the gene encoding an enzyme called monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) has been found to render the enzyme nonfunctional. This enzyme normally catalyzes reactions that metabolize the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and oradrenaline. What this does is cause slight mental impairment which interferes with the ability to cope with certain situations resulting in aggression. There is no proof and there never has been that the American Pit Bull Terrier possesses mutant genes. There is a one in ten thousand chance of a mutant gene appearing in a population.

Aggressiveness has many definitions and its stimulus of the environment that causes behavior. Dogs defend territory, they exhibit dominance and if allowed can become protective of their family. All this behavior can be controlled by the owner and aggression is mainly an act of behavior. To make claim that the American Pit Bull Terrier can cause more severe injury than other breeds is ludicrous. Over 30 breeds of dogs are responsible for over 500 fatal attacks in the last 30 years, every victim was severely injured. The American Pit Bull Terrier is clearly a useful member of society. The breed was World War One Hero and it’s rated as having one of the best overall temperaments in the United States (A.T.T.S.). The breed is used for dog show competitions, therapy, service work, search and rescue, police work and companionship. Man has domesticated dogs to the point they serve as companions, workers and even objects of beauty. Dogs will protect man, see for him, hunt for him and play. One breed is not more inherently good or evil, vicious, harmful or helpful. It is man who is responsible for the dog’s behavior, not the breed of dog. Those passing breed bans fail to understand that a mis-trained Pit Bull can be replaced with another breed. People determine whether dogs will be useful members of a community or a nuisance. It is the people who allow their dogs to become dangerous and legislators must control and punish the people.” 

zeffpitts
zeffpitts


“Pit bull” is not a breed, but a “type” that encompasses several registered breeds and crossbreeds. Therefore, statistics that claim “Pit bulls” are responsible for some percentage of attacks are lumping many separate breeds of dogs together, then comparing those statistics to other dogs that are counted as individual breeds. There are currently 25 breeds that are commonly considered a “pit bull”.

Myth: Pit Bulls or Pit Bull type dogs are human aggressive by nature.

Fact: Studies by the Center for Disease Control have proven that no one breed of dog is inherently vicious. The CDC supports the position that irresponsible owners, NOT breed, is the number one cause of dog bites. 

Myth: Pit Bulls or Pit Bull type dogs are inherently vicious.

Fact: No more vicious than Golden Retrievers, Beagles, or other popular “family” dogs. In a recent testing done by The American Canine Temperament Testing Society (ATT), pit bulls achieved a passing rate of 83.9%, passing 4th from the highest of 122 breeds. That’s better than Beagles, passing at 78.2 and Golden Retrievers passing at 83.2%. The average passing rate for ALL breeds is 77%.

Myth: Pit Bulls or Pit Bull type dogs are responsible for most fatal dog attacks.

Fact: From 1965 – 2001, there have been at least 36 different breeds/types of dog that have been involved in a fatal attack in the United States. (This number rises to at least 52 breeds/types when surveying fatal attacks worldwide).

When dog bite statistics are taken into consideration versus the population, “Pit Bulls” come in at the BOTTOM of the list.

Registered Population

# of Reported Attacks

Breed

% vs. Population

Approx. 240,000 12 Chow Chow .005%

Approx. 800,000 67 German Shepherd .008375%

Approx. 960,000 70 Rottweiler .00729%

Approx. 128,000 18 Great Dane .01416%

Approx. 114,000 14 Doberman .012288%

Approx. 72,000 10 St. Bernard .0139%

Approx. 5,000,000 60 Pit Bulls .0012%

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

Abstract

Journal of the American Veterinary Medical AssociationDecember 15, 2013, Vol. 243, No. 12, Pages 1726-1736doi: 10.2460/javma.243.12.1726
Co-occurrence of potentially preventable factors in 256 dog bite–related fatalities in the United States (2000–2009)5 Top tips to choose the right car insurance (TopTipsNews)Gary J. PatronekVMD, PhDJeffrey J. SacksMD, MPHKaren M. Delise;Donald V. ClearyBAAmy R. MarderVMDCenter for Animals and Public Policy, Department of Environmental and Population Health, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536. (Patronek); Sue Binder Consulting Inc, 3958 Preston Ct NE, Atlanta, GA 30319. (Sacks); National Canine Research Council, 433 Pugsley Hill Rd, Amenia, NY 12501. (Delise, Cleary); Center for Shelter Dogs at the Animal Rescue League of Boston, 10 Chandler St, Boston, MA 02116. (Marder)

The National Canine Research Council supported the efforts of Karen Delise from 2006 to 2011 for assembly of case reports and data abstraction and Kara Gilmore, JD, for assistance with data abstraction and validation from case reports.

Donald Cleary is Director of Communications and Publications at the National Canine Research Council and Treasurer of Animal Farm Foundation, parent organization of the National Canine Research Council.

Presented in part as an oral presentation at the AVMA Annual Convention, Chicago, July 2013.

Address correspondence to Dr. Patronek (gary.patronek@tufts.edu).

Objective—To examine potentially preventable factors in human dog bite–related fatalities (DBRFs) on the basis of data from sources that were more complete, verifiable, and accurate than media reports used in previous studies.

Design—Prospective case series.

Sample—256 DBRFs occurring in the United States from 2000 to 2009.

Procedures—DBRFs were identified from media reports and detailed histories were compiled on the basis of reports from homicide detectives, animal control reports, and interviews with investigators for coding and descriptive analysis.

Results—Major co-occurrent factors for the 256 DBRFs included absence of an able-bodied person to intervene (n = 223 [87.1%]), incidental or no familiar relationship of victims with dogs (218 [85.2%]), owner failure to neuter dogs (216 [84.4%]), compromised ability of victims to interact appropriately with dogs (198 [77.4%]), dogs kept isolated from regular positive human interactions versus family dogs (195 [76.2%]), owners’ prior mismanagement of dogs (96 [37.5%]), and owners’ history of abuse or neglect of dogs (54 [21.1%]). Four or more of these factors co-occurred in 206 (80.5%) deaths. For 401 dogs described in various media accounts, reported breed differed for 124 (30.9%); for 346 dogs with both media and animal control breed reports, breed differed for 139 (40.2%). Valid breed determination was possible for only 45 (17.6%) DBRFs; 20 breeds, including 2 known mixes, were identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Most DBRFs were characterized by coincident, preventable factors; breed was not one of these. Study results supported previous recommendations for multifactorial approaches, instead of single-factor solutions such as breed-specific legislation, for dog bite prevention.

Jenny Zuniga
Jenny Zuniga

I've met some chihuahuas that are scarier than any pit I've ever met.

Liz131
Liz131

THANK YOU! Not worth arguing with anti-pit people. Everyone has their opinion. I do, however, have one suggestion: instead of sitting on your couches spewing your online research, how about visiting a Pit Bull rescue group in town and experience the really good side of these breeds yourselves. You might be amazed at what you discover.

Tara Oakes
Tara Oakes

I have pit rescue, Mamacita. Our vet believes she was a breeder dog that was abandoned before Hurricane Ike. We took her and her puppies in the day before Ike hit and she's been a loving member of our family ever since. That girl has never met a human she didn't like. Even people that enter our backyard unannounced get happily licked!

Hippie El'jefe Hipperson
Hippie El'jefe Hipperson

I have a pit bill named hydro I love him to death he's a total sweet heart. I also have a jack Russel named Rocky now him you have to look out for.

1084
1084

This is just classic.

You claim that Annals of Surgery, a peer-reviewed journal, is not a credible source. Your source for this claim is a blog with only two entries by someone named "myra." Give me a break.

You fail to mention that the ATTS organization's own website which clearly states that the test score "is not a measure of a breed's aggression." The ATTS test is pseudoscientific and does not compare breeds on an even playing field. According to the president of the organization, the vast majority of failures (over 95%) have nothing to do with aggression. The test is screening for fear, not aggression. The ATTS test bears little resemblance to the SAFER test, Assess-a-Pet, or any other test used by shelters for the purpose of revealing aggression. ATTS does not require a dog to meet a child, another dog, tolerate handling or restraint, or tolerate a person reaching for a food dish -- actual tests of aggression do.

Pit bull advocates quietly recommend that pit bull owners carry "break sticks" in case the pit bull "has a hold" on its target. What other breed requires special tools to force them to let go? http://www.pbrc.net/breaksticks.html

Also, please tell me where folks like Jeff Borchardt, Susan Iwicki, Angela Rutledge, Roxanne Hartrich, Crystal Trenkamp, etc. fall on your Scumbag-Dipshit Axis.

jnlsands
jnlsands

@zeffpitts HEY!!!!   YOUR LINKS DON"T WORK!!!!   you got to get them working!  please

zeffpitts
zeffpitts


6) Getting Rid of Breed to Fix the Deed

This is an interesting one because not so long ago Rottweilers and Dobermans were in the same spot they now have Pit Bulls in. In articles found on the CDC's website they state that if Pit Bulls were to be removed from society another breed would simply takes its place. However, Dogsbite.org doesn't see that way. They think that by removing the Pit Bulls from society that magically the deeds of dog owners will also disappear. They are saying that people involved in dog fighting will not longer do it if they have no access to Pit Bulls. Which is not the way society or gangs work. The groups who support dog fighting will find another breed to use, Rottweilers are probably a top contender for fighting rings.

7) Most Law Makers Are Afraid To Take Action

This is unfounded. If law makers were afraid to take action then people wouldn't be in fear of new laws and ordinances that prevent them from keeping their pets. Groups of responsible Pit Bull owners wouldn't be trying to change the laws that are in place. Innocent dogs wouldn't be destroyed because of their appearance.

8) Lowering The Pit Bull Population Will Lower The Number of Dog Attacks

Again, most dogs that attack are not trained properly! The facts on dog bites are pretty easy to understand, most dog involved in attacks and bites are unaltered, meaning they haven't been spayed or neutered. That fact is not based on any one breed but all attacks and bites that are recorded from all breeds. Taking Pit Bulls out the equation isn't the solution. People will turn their focus to another breed. This is how society and fear works. You can't eliminate the fear just by taking away one breed. Either destroy all breeds or enact spay and neuter laws.

9) The Fewer Pit Bulls There Are The Fewer Pit Bull Bites

Okay, yes in theory and exact numbers this one is true. But if you lower the number of Pit Bulls the only way to get an accurate assement of the improvement, if there is one, is to look at the overall percentages. They need to take the percentage of Pit Bull related bites from the larger group and compare it to the percentage of Pit Bull related bites from the smaller group. Just looking at the numbers will give you a false sense of improvement.

If there are 1000 Pit Bulls and 20 of them bite and you compare that to having only 100 Pit Bulls where 2 of them bite you feel more secure... Right? Wrong, you never improved the situation, it's still at 2% will bite. The equation never changed and the problem hasn't improved at all.

10) All Pit Bulls Are Dangerous

This website has some of the most inaccurate information out on the internet. If you compare their "statistics" to those of actual statistics, like from the CDC and AVMA ( the two sources with real information) you can see a problem in the data. The statement that they are pushing is that Pit Bulls are aggressive and untrustworthy, dangerous even, is a misguided statement by people would have had tragic accidents at the mouths of Pit Bulls. However, it is a small group and in most cases the facts are hazy at best. I'm not saying anything against people who have been bitten or attacked by Pit Bulls but out of thousands of Pit Bulls how many really do attack unprovoked?

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

What is notable is the significant drop in dog bites of all breeds, from 1,146 in 1990 to 305 in 2008. Animal control officials attribute this decrease in total bites to increased enforcement of Denver's non-breed specific dog laws and county-wide spaying and neutering efforts.

Some studies on dog bites show pit bulls and Rottweilers as inflicting the most reported bites; others show Golden Retrievers, Labs and Chow Chows as causing the most. But is this because these breeds bite more often or because more of these dogs are represented in a given area? Since there's no reliable doggy census, it's nearly impossible to know if one breed bites more often than another. logs.westword.com/latestword/2009/09/3497_dead_dogs_and_other_numbe.php

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

i've been bitten twice by maltese terriors!

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

@Liz131  Canine Genetics and Behavior

By Glen Bui, American Canine Foundation

“To state that a breed of dog is aggressive is scientifically impossible. Statistics do not support such a finding. Dogs have been domesticated for thousands of years and within all breeds there can be dangerous dogs because of owner issues such as training the dog to attack, lack of training and socialization.

There is no such thing as the “Mean Gene” in dogs as well as in people. However, mutant genes have been discovered. Alteration of a single DNA base in the gene encoding an enzyme called monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) has been found to render the enzyme nonfunctional. This enzyme normally catalyzes reactions that metabolize the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and oradrenaline. What this does is cause slight mental impairment which interferes with the ability to cope with certain situations resulting in aggression. There is no proof and there never has been that the American Pit Bull Terrier possesses mutant genes. There is a one in ten thousand chance of a mutant gene appearing in a population.

Aggressiveness has many definitions and its stimulus of the environment that causes behavior. Dogs defend territory, they exhibit dominance and if allowed can become protective of their family. All this behavior can be controlled by the owner and aggression is mainly an act of behavior. To make claim that the American Pit Bull Terrier can cause more severe injury than other breeds is ludicrous. Over 30 breeds of dogs are responsible for over 500 fatal attacks in the last 30 years, every victim was severely injured. The American Pit Bull Terrier is clearly a useful member of society. The breed was World War One Hero and it’s rated as having one of the best overall temperaments in the United States (A.T.T.S.). The breed is used for dog show competitions, therapy, service work, search and rescue, police work and companionship. Man has domesticated dogs to the point they serve as companions, workers and even objects of beauty. Dogs will protect man, see for him, hunt for him and play. One breed is not more inherently good or evil, vicious, harmful or helpful. It is man who is responsible for the dog’s behavior, not the breed of dog. Those passing breed bans fail to understand that a mis-trained Pit Bull can be replaced with another breed. People determine whether dogs will be useful members of a community or a nuisance. It is the people who allow their dogs to become dangerous and legislators must control and punish the people.” 

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

10 Things Dogsbite.org Is Trying To Pass Off As Facts

Who They Are

Dogsbite.org is a website dedicated to wiping out the American Pit Bull Terrier and other bully breed dogs. They are on a mission, charged by their leader, a former bite victim, who has little to no expert knowledge in these types of dogs. The website is vast and has a following, however there are numerous "facts" on the site that are questionable at best. Reading through them and doing accurate fact checking shows a pattern that is misleading and down right untrue.

Here are 10 things that Dogsbite.org would like you to believe as being true facts however have no basis or are opinions rather than facts.


1) It's The Breed Not The Deed

For years, the slogan "Punish the deed not the breed" has been yelled, chanted and plastered everywhere when the debate comes up about the dangers of pit bulls. Through admission of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) and the Center for Disease Control (CDC) there is no accurate way to determine if one breed of domesticated dog is more dangerous or prone to attacks as opposed to any other breed.

Also through temperament testing, where properly trained dogs are evaluated, American Pit Bull Terriers scored very well as being suitable pets, with only 5 % showing unprovoked aggression. Compared to Chihuahuas that showed 11 % unprovoked aggression. This does lead us to believe that trained pit bulls are less dangerous then trained chihuahuas and that it is left at the fault of the owner not the dog.

2) A Pit Bull Is Obviously a Pit Bull

There are around 20 different breeds of dogs that have similar physical traits as American Pit Bull Terriers. Many people can't tell the difference between these dogs. Ca De Bou is a Mallorquin Bulldog, not a Pit Bull. Cane Corso breed also has very similar features and by the looks of them, they could fit into the "pit bull type" category but they too are not Pit Bulls. According to the CDC and AVMA the only way to prove or accurately identify a breed of dog is to do DNA testing. Since people don't want to test every dog they see, they will just give a general description like "it looked like a pit bull" or make a guess "it was a pit bull" without actually knowing.

3) Media Coverage is Accurate About Pit Bulls

We all know that you can't believe everything you see or hear on the news. Media coverage isn't always accurate and certainly doesn't do as much as it could to get facts instead of focusing so much on stories. Yes Pit Bulls can inflict massive damage onto a person so when one does it tends to make the news headlines. But what about the poodle that bit a kid over 10 times in the course of a only a few moments and left the child covered in blood? A poodle isn't a controversial as a pit bull. Its been proven that the media will forego stories for better ones or one that will at least stir up the viewers.

4) All Pit Bulls Are Unpredictable

Well this one is true but only to a point. You can not predict what any domesticated or wild animal is going to do in every situation. It is impossible. Every dog has the ability to snap or become aggressive, it all about the environment they are in and how they have been trained. This, though, does not mean they will not bite! Every dog, cat, pet and person is capable of killing something or someone, It doesn't have to be premeditated. To simply say that Pit Bulls are unpredictable is to completely ignore the existence of all other breeds when kept in the context in which DogsBite.org has it.

5) Pit Bulls Don't Pass Any Temperament Testing

Temperament testing with dogs is subjective, it is based on trained dogs. Basic training means that the dog listens to the handler, can walk properly on a leash and understands basic commands such as sit and stay. There is no elaborate doggy boot camp that the dogs have to attend first, just that they be basically trained. Properly trained Pit Bulls do pass basic temperament tests, this means they do not show unprovoked aggression just because they are Pit Bulls. Every breed will have some percentage that shows unprovoked aggression even when trained. Every breed will have some percentage that is not trained and that has severe aggression issues including biting people, attacking other animals, or mauling children. These acts do not pertain only to Pit Bulls. They are universal traits of non-socialized, untrained and not properly cared for dog regardless of breed. 

zeffpitts
zeffpitts


“Pit bull” is not a breed, but a “type” that encompasses several registered breeds and crossbreeds. Therefore, statistics that claim “Pit bulls” are responsible for some percentage of attacks are lumping many separate breeds of dogs together, then comparing those statistics to other dogs that are counted as individual breeds. There are currently 25 breeds that are commonly considered a “pit bull”.

Myth: Pit Bulls or Pit Bull type dogs are human aggressive by nature.

Fact: Studies by the Center for Disease Control have proven that no one breed of dog is inherently vicious. The CDC supports the position that irresponsible owners, NOT breed, is the number one cause of dog bites. 

Myth: Pit Bulls or Pit Bull type dogs are inherently vicious.

Fact: No more vicious than Golden Retrievers, Beagles, or other popular “family” dogs. In a recent testing done by The American Canine Temperament Testing Society (ATT), pit bulls achieved a passing rate of 83.9%, passing 4th from the highest of 122 breeds. That’s better than Beagles, passing at 78.2 and Golden Retrievers passing at 83.2%. The average passing rate for ALL breeds is 77%.

Myth: Pit Bulls or Pit Bull type dogs are responsible for most fatal dog attacks.

Fact: From 1965 – 2001, there have been at least 36 different breeds/types of dog that have been involved in a fatal attack in the United States. (This number rises to at least 52 breeds/types when surveying fatal attacks worldwide).

When dog bite statistics are taken into consideration versus the population, “Pit Bulls” come in at the BOTTOM of the list.

Registered Population

# of Reported Attacks

Breed

% vs. Population

Approx. 240,000 12 Chow Chow .005%

Approx. 800,000 67 German Shepherd .008375%

Approx. 960,000 70 Rottweiler .00729%

Approx. 128,000 18 Great Dane .01416%

Approx. 114,000 14 Doberman .012288%

Approx. 72,000 10 St. Bernard .0139%

Approx. 5,000,000 60 Pit Bulls .0012% 

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

Proponents of breed bans, such as Denver Assistant City Attorney Kory Nelson, instead argue that pit bulls are more dangerous because, when they do bite, the injuries they inflict are more serious. So we looked at figures gathered by the Colorado Department of Public and Environment on hospitalization rates for dogs by county. From 1995 to 2006, more people sought medical attention for dog bites in Denver County than anywhere else in the state. Counties without pit bull bans -- Boulder, El Paso and Jefferson -- showed fewer people going to the hospital dog bites.Are bites from pit bulls more severe?


BiteLevelByBreed_chart.jpg

Bite severity by breed (click to enlarge)

The Coalition for Living Safely with Dogs, a Colorado group made up of veterinary associations and animal welfare groups, gathered information from animal control divisions across the state. Their report found that the severity of pit bull bites -- 1 being a "bruising" and 5 being a "maul (serious bodily injury)" -- was about the same as bites from breeds such as Australian Cattle Dogs and Akitas, and below breeds such as American Bull Dogs, Dalmatians and Dachshunds.

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

Organizations Against Breed Specific Legislation:

American  Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)

The American Kennel Club (AKC)

The United Kennel Club (UKC)

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA)

American Temperament Testing Society (ATTS)

National Animal Control Association (NACA)

Maryland Veterinary Medicine Association

Humane Society of the United States (HSUS)

American Canine Foundation (ACF) 

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

@1084 we'll leave the name calling to you all for now, eventually everyone will know the difference between the truth, and what your saying? 

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

@1084 Presented in part as an oral presentation at the AVMA Annual Convention, Chicago, July 2013.

Address correspondence to Dr. Patronek (gary.patronek@tufts.edu).

Objective—To examine potentially preventable factors in human dog bite–related fatalities (DBRFs) on the basis of data from sources that were more complete, verifiable, and accurate than media reports used in previous studies.

Design—Prospective case series.

Sample—256 DBRFs occurring in the United States from 2000 to 2009.

Procedures—DBRFs were identified from media reports and detailed histories were compiled on the basis of reports from homicide detectives, animal control reports, and interviews with investigators for coding and descriptive analysis.

Results—Major co-occurrent factors for the 256 DBRFs included absence of an able-bodied person to intervene (n = 223 [87.1%]), incidental or no familiar relationship of victims with dogs (218 [85.2%]), owner failure to neuter dogs (216 [84.4%]), compromised ability of victims to interact appropriately with dogs (198 [77.4%]), dogs kept isolated from regular positive human interactions versus family dogs (195 [76.2%]), owners’ prior mismanagement of dogs (96 [37.5%]), and owners’ history of abuse or neglect of dogs (54 [21.1%]). Four or more of these factors co-occurred in 206 (80.5%) deaths. For 401 dogs described in various media accounts, reported breed differed for 124 (30.9%); for 346 dogs with both media and animal control breed reports, breed differed for 139 (40.2%). Valid breed determination was possible for only 45 (17.6%) DBRFs; 20 breeds, including 2 known mixes, were identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Most DBRFs were characterized by coincident, preventable factors; breed was not one of these. Study results supported previous recommendations for multifactorial approaches, instead of single-factor solutions such as breed-specific legislation, for dog bite prevention.

http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/abs/10.2460/javma.243.12.1726

bendoverkma
bendoverkma

@jnlsands @zeffpitts when links don't work i try copy and paste sections of text and copy and paste into google search field should get you the stuff you want?

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

6) Getting Rid of Breed to Fix the Deed

This is an interesting one because not so long ago Rottweilers and Dobermans were in the same spot they now have Pit Bulls in. In articles found on the CDC's website they state that if Pit Bulls were to be removed from society another breed would simply takes its place. However, Dogsbite.org doesn't see that way. They think that by removing the Pit Bulls from society that magically the deeds of dog owners will also disappear. They are saying that people involved in dog fighting will not longer do it if they have no access to Pit Bulls. Which is not the way society or gangs work. The groups who support dog fighting will find another breed to use, Rottweilers are probably a top contender for fighting rings.

7) Most Law Makers Are Afraid To Take Action

This is unfounded. If law makers were afraid to take action then people wouldn't be in fear of new laws and ordinances that prevent them from keeping their pets. Groups of responsible Pit Bull owners wouldn't be trying to change the laws that are in place. Innocent dogs wouldn't be destroyed because of their appearance.

8) Lowering The Pit Bull Population Will Lower The Number of Dog Attacks

Again, most dogs that attack are not trained properly! The facts on dog bites are pretty easy to understand, most dog involved in attacks and bites are unaltered, meaning they haven't been spayed or neutered. That fact is not based on any one breed but all attacks and bites that are recorded from all breeds. Taking Pit Bulls out the equation isn't the solution. People will turn their focus to another breed. This is how society and fear works. You can't eliminate the fear just by taking away one breed. Either destroy all breeds or enact spay and neuter laws.

9) The Fewer Pit Bulls There Are The Fewer Pit Bull Bites

Okay, yes in theory and exact numbers this one is true. But if you lower the number of Pit Bulls the only way to get an accurate assement of the improvement, if there is one, is to look at the overall percentages. They need to take the percentage of Pit Bull related bites from the larger group and compare it to the percentage of Pit Bull related bites from the smaller group. Just looking at the numbers will give you a false sense of improvement.

If there are 1000 Pit Bulls and 20 of them bite and you compare that to having only 100 Pit Bulls where 2 of them bite you feel more secure... Right? Wrong, you never improved the situation, it's still at 2% will bite. The equation never changed and the problem hasn't improved at all.

10) All Pit Bulls Are Dangerous

This website has some of the most inaccurate information out on the internet. If you compare their "statistics" to those of actual statistics, like from the CDC and AVMA ( the two sources with real information) you can see a problem in the data. The statement that they are pushing is that Pit Bulls are aggressive and untrustworthy, dangerous even, is a misguided statement by people would have had tragic accidents at the mouths of Pit Bulls. However, it is a small group and in most cases the facts are hazy at best. I'm not saying anything against people who have been bitten or attacked by Pit Bulls but out of thousands of Pit Bulls how many really do attack unprovoked?

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

AbstractJournal of the American Veterinary Medical AssociationDecember 15, 2013, Vol. 243, No. 12, Pages 1726-1736doi: 10.2460/javma.243.12.1726
Co-occurrence of potentially preventable factors in 256 dog bite–related fatalities in the United States (2000–2009)Did you know your can participate in the US Powerball lottery? (Lottoneto)Gary J. PatronekVMD, PhDJeffrey J. SacksMD, MPHKaren M. Delise;Donald V. ClearyBAAmy R. MarderVMDCenter for Animals and Public Policy, Department of Environmental and Population Health, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536. (Patronek); Sue Binder Consulting Inc, 3958 Preston Ct NE, Atlanta, GA 30319. (Sacks); National Canine Research Council, 433 Pugsley Hill Rd, Amenia, NY 12501. (Delise, Cleary); Center for Shelter Dogs at the Animal Rescue League of Boston, 10 Chandler St, Boston, MA 02116. (Marder)

The National Canine Research Council supported the efforts of Karen Delise from 2006 to 2011 for assembly of case reports and data abstraction and Kara Gilmore, JD, for assistance with data abstraction and validation from case reports.

Donald Cleary is Director of Communications and Publications at the National Canine Research Council and Treasurer of Animal Farm Foundation, parent organization of the National Canine Research Council.

Presented in part as an oral presentation at the AVMA Annual Convention, Chicago, July 2013.

Address correspondence to Dr. Patronek (gary.patronek@tufts.edu).

Objective—To examine potentially preventable factors in human dog bite–related fatalities (DBRFs) on the basis of data from sources that were more complete, verifiable, and accurate than media reports used in previous studies.

Design—Prospective case series.

Sample—256 DBRFs occurring in the United States from 2000 to 2009.

Procedures—DBRFs were identified from media reports and detailed histories were compiled on the basis of reports from homicide detectives, animal control reports, and interviews with investigators for coding and descriptive analysis.

Results—Major co-occurrent factors for the 256 DBRFs included absence of an able-bodied person to intervene (n = 223 [87.1%]), incidental or no familiar relationship of victims with dogs (218 [85.2%]), owner failure to neuter dogs (216 [84.4%]), compromised ability of victims to interact appropriately with dogs (198 [77.4%]), dogs kept isolated from regular positive human interactions versus family dogs (195 [76.2%]), owners’ prior mismanagement of dogs (96 [37.5%]), and owners’ history of abuse or neglect of dogs (54 [21.1%]). Four or more of these factors co-occurred in 206 (80.5%) deaths. For 401 dogs described in various media accounts, reported breed differed for 124 (30.9%); for 346 dogs with both media and animal control breed reports, breed differed for 139 (40.2%). Valid breed determination was possible for only 45 (17.6%) DBRFs; 20 breeds, including 2 known mixes, were identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Most DBRFs were characterized by coincident, preventable factors; breed was not one of these. Study results supported previous recommendations for multifactorial approaches, instead of single-factor solutions such as breed-specific legislation, for dog bite prevention. 

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

@1084 KILLED: Infant killed by a Pomeranian

http://articles.latimes.com/20...


KILLED: Infant killed by a Retriever-

Chow Mix http://alldogsbite.org/2013/08...


KILLED: 2 yr.old girl killed by Great Dane

http://www.unchainyourdog.org/...


KILLED: Infant killed by Golden Retriever

http://retrieverman.net/2012/0...


KILLED: One year old boy killed by Rottweiler 

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


KILLED: Infant killed by Jack Russell Terrier

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


KILLED: Elderly woman killed by a

Cane Corso

http://btoellner.typepad.com/k...


KILLED: A newborn baby killed by

Shiba Inus

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


KILLED: Elderly woman killed by Rottweiler 

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


KILLED: 7 yr. old girl killed by Malamutes

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


KILLED: 13 yr. old boy killed by Mastiff

http://www.northjersey.com/mob...


KILLED: 4 yr. old girl killed by Labrador/Husky mix 

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014...


Golden Retriever attacks boy

http://www.wcnc.com/news/local...


A Labrador and a Rottweiler attack a toddler 

http://www.news.com.au/lifesty...


Dachshund critically injured infant

http://articles.latimes.com/20...


Chocolate Labrador brutally attacks a 6 yr. old girl

http://www.abcactionnews.com/n...


Labradoodle attacks teenage girl

http://www.3news.co.nz/Dog-att...


Cocker Spaniel attacks young girl

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Woman is injured by poodles

http://kdvr.com/2013/07/09/wom...


Toddler mauled by Dalmatian 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_...


An infant is mauled by an Akita

http://www.azfamily.com/home/B...


Elderly man attacked by Greyhounds

http://www.sptimes.com/2007/12...


Young girl attacked by

Australian Shepherd

http://m.walb.com/#!/newsDetai...


St. Bernard-Labrador mix attacks a boy, crippling him

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/a...


13 yr. old boy attacked by

Australian Shepherds

http://www.farahandfarah.com/b...


DirectTV employee seriously injured by German Shepherd Dogs 

http://www.wdrb.com/story/2540...


Black Labrador attacks a 3 year old boy

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new...


A labrador-chow mix attacks an autistic child, completely un-provoked

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Novia Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever bites a toddler's face

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Cairn Terrier mauls a toddler

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new...


2 Mastiffs attack a jogger

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Labrador-Shepherd Mix attack elderly woman

http://www.niagara-gazette.com...


A Samoyed Husky attacks middle-aged woman

http://www.burtonmail.co.uk/Ne...


A 4 year old is nearly killed when a Labrador attacks him

http://www.couriermail.com.au/...


A pregnant woman's lip is nearly torn of when she is attacked by a Rhodesian Ridgeback 

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


A teenager is mauled by a husky

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Toddler's face disfigured after a Jack Russell Terrier attack

http://www.parentdish.co.uk/20...


Teenage boy attacked by Doberman-Shepherd mix

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Leonberger attacks a young girl

http://www.bristolpost.co.uk/p...


Chihuahua brutally attacks a very young girl

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Elderly woman attacked by Husky

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Labrador attacks small boy 

http://www.hometownlife.com/ar...


Desmond Tan was attacked by Golden Retriever

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Akita attacks boy

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Akita attacks a young girl

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Young boy attacked by Black Lab Mix

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Australian Shepherd Mix bites young girl

http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=...


Yellow Labrador attacks twice in one month

http://www.1011now.com/home/he...


Japanese Akita brutally mauls toddler

http://www.business-standard.c...


Labrador jumps school fence, attacks a boy

http://www.10tv.com/content/st..

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

@1084 Organizations Against Breed Specific Legislation:

American  Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)

The American Kennel Club (AKC)

The United Kennel Club (UKC)

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA)

American Temperament Testing Society (ATTS)

National Animal Control Association (NACA)

Maryland Veterinary Medicine Association

Humane Society of the United States (HSUS)

American Canine Foundation (ACF)

zeffpitts
zeffpitts

@1084 “Pit bull” is not a breed, but a “type” that encompasses several registered breeds and crossbreeds. Therefore, statistics that claim “Pit bulls” are responsible for some percentage of attacks are lumping many separate breeds of dogs together, then comparing those statistics to other dogs that are counted as individual breeds. There are currently 25 breeds that are commonly considered a “pit bull”.

Myth: Pit Bulls or Pit Bull type dogs are human aggressive by nature.

Fact: Studies by the Center for Disease Control have proven that no one breed of dog is inherently vicious. The CDC supports the position that irresponsible owners, NOT breed, is the number one cause of dog bites.

Myth: Pit Bulls or Pit Bull type dogs are inherently vicious.

Fact: No more vicious than Golden Retrievers, Beagles, or other popular “family” dogs. In a recent testing done by The American Canine Temperament Testing Society (ATT), pit bulls achieved a passing rate of 83.9%, passing 4th from the highest of 122 breeds. That’s better than Beagles, passing at 78.2 and Golden Retrievers passing at 83.2%. The average passing rate for ALL breeds is 77%. http://mabbr.org/pit-bull.../the-truth-about-pit-bulls/

http://mabbr.org/pit-bull-ownership/the-truth-about-pit-bulls/

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