Texas Public School Bible Courses Sparsely Offered, Poorly Taught

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Six years after lawmakers agreed Bible courses could be offered in Texas schools, the Texas Freedom Network finds that course offerings are neither "legally appropriate nor academically sound," according to a report released today.

Lawmakers, after much wrangling that included input from Jewish Houston Rep. Scott Hochberg, passed down a bill in 2007 that directed school districts to offer one of two options: the Bible as history or the Bible as literature.

Today, about five dozen school districts and charter schools offer some type of Bible course, including the Goose Creek, Klein, La Porte and Conroe school districts locally. But Dan Quinn of the Texas Freedom Network says lawmakers probably wouldn't recognize some of the lessons being taught in Texas classrooms.

Nor has a deluge of requests to offer such a course rained down on the Texas Education Agency, as some lawmakers predicted. In fact, the number of districts that offer some aspect of a stand-alone Bible course now sits at 57 school districts and 3 charter schools out of just over 1,000 districts and charters across the state.

"If the kids in your classroom are relying on Hanna-Barbera cartoons on Bible stories or films about extra-terrestrials being angels, then you have a problem," said Quinn. "The legislature included some really good guidelines on how to do this course in the most appropriate way, and many have failed to implement guidelines."

A review of class offerings by Mark Chancey, professor of religious studies at Southern Methodist University, uncovered a sectarian bias toward conservative Protestants, some pseudo-scholarship beliefs such as Noah's sons begatting the races of the world and even a dash of new earth creationism.

In short, little has changed since Chancey last reviewed the courses six years ago.

Quinn attributes the problems to a lack of guidance from the State Board of Education on course content and no funding from the Texas Education Agency on teacher training. Agency spokeswoman Debbie Ratcliffe said the SBOE had offered broad guidelines, if not specific learning objectives, for the courses.

"We did not receive funding to implement professional development when the bill first passed, but we did include development of an online course to be offered through Project Share as part of the deliverables for professional development related to implementation of the new social studies TEKS," Ratcliffe said. "The course has been developed and is undergoing review right now."


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16 comments
simondelao
simondelao

I thought only Florida had the corner on stupidity. To offer classes about the "Big Book of Poorly Written Fairy Tales" in high school takes the cake.

jethro
jethro

The Bible is all over the place. You could use it to teach love and goodness. Or hate and vileness. I think we best keep it as an artifact of the past, and appreciate it as a bit of history and literature, a holy book to some, but no more elevated than other holy scripture.

edsilha
edsilha

The law permitting this type of course is not necessary (i.e., the legislature wasted resources developing the law) and it is not likely to be constitutional. Schools can introduce courses that discuss the Bible as history or literature regardless of the existence of the law. By focusing only on the Bible, the law seems to promote Judeo-Christian beliefs over other religious texts (e.g., the Koran, Vedas) raising the question of the constitutionally of the law.

vonEggers
vonEggers

Sad that we are so poorly educated in the US vis a vis Europe and other developed countries, yet we are debating learning about the bible.

Dunstan
Dunstan

How does one 'teach the Bible'? It's an ancient book with many authors, and two testaments, containing some good and some awfully bad stuff. Who gets the final edit on what to take seriously and what to laugh at and dismiss?

BBeckman
BBeckman

@Dunstan I think it's just simpler to pretend it's all one piece dictated by one guy, namely God, through various secretaries we like to call prophets and disciples and such. Every religion has its equivalent, and they all believe it's the holy word. Kinda funny if you think about it. Humans must have a gene that makes this type of thing likely. Christopher Hitchens writes how it's just one tiny stage removed from chimp-think.

No_PC_BS
No_PC_BS

@Dunstan  Perhaps you should toss your hat in the ring since you are such a Bible expert.

simondelao
simondelao

Well we finally get to meet Louis Gohmert's boyfriend 

No_PC_BS
No_PC_BS

@BBeckman You are so much smarter than the 6.8 billion people in the World with faith. They're all barely smarter than apes.

Hauptstadt
Hauptstadt

@No_PC_BS @Hauptstadt What kind of argument is that son? There are more of one than another, therefore the one with more is right? 

corposanto
corposanto

@No_PC_BS @Hauptstadt wrong, the developed European countries have long been going more atheist, and faith is on the rise in the underdeveloped parts of the world (where we tend to have more war, coincidentally)

No_PC_BS
No_PC_BS

@Hauptstadt  Meanwhile, those without faith are in the severe minority both here in the U.S.A. as well as the rest of the World.

Hauptstadt
Hauptstadt

@No_PC_BS  I say let us reject these elitist ideas like evolution; I'm in for BiblePark USA! where kids can stroll with velociraptors and wander around in the Ark!

BBeckman
BBeckman

@No_PC_BS @BBeckman Well, yes, and thank you. Evolution as you may have heard. Not sure if you're much into that however if you believe the good book. It says that dinosaurs roamed the earth alongside man.

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