NFL Films President Steve Sabol (1942-2012): 5 Top Ways He Was An Innovator, Visionary, Storyteller

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Fu Manchu on the frozen tundra
''Today of course those techniques are so common it's hard to imagine just how radical they once were. Believe me, it wasn't always easy getting people to accept them, but I think it was worth the effort.'' -- Steve Sabol in a 2011 interview with the Associated Press, discussing his and his father's various innovations in filming NFL football

The NFL brings in an estimated $18 billion annually in television revenue, so the $50 million that NFL Films generates each year seems relatively insignificant. However, you could argue that without NFL Films' providing the prism through which many of us consume football outside of actual "on the field" hours, and without NFL Films' showing us the game's personalities and turning one-dimensional players into three-dimensional characters, the popularity the league has achieved to demand $18 billion annually from the networks would not exist.

On Tuesday, NFL Films president Steve Sabol, one half of the father-son duo who revolutionized how and why we watch American football, succumbed to brain cancer at the age of 69.

The Sabols have spent the last five decades telling stories, stories of every NFL player and franchise, every big game and botched snap. So today, it's only appropriate that Steve Sabol's story will get told thousands of times on television and in stories like this.

So here goes:

In 1962, a topcoat salesman turned aspiring filmmaker named Ed Sabol was hired for $12,000 by NFL commissioner Pete Rozelle to film the NFL Championship Game. So impressed was Commissioner Rozelle by Sabol's work that he asked his ownership constituency to fund Sabol's company and make it the de facto production arm of his league.

One year and $20,000 in seed money per owner later, NFL Films was created, and Ed Sabol, along with his son, Steve, would spend the next five decades creating and shaping NFL memories for fans of all ages through various highlight packages, home videos, vignettes and specialty shows.

Steve himself would start out alongside his father as a cameraman, and eventually became an editor and writer as well throughout the 1960s and 1970s. When ESPN was launched in 1979, they signed NFL Films as a production company and Steve Sabol became an on-air personality. And make no mistake, to a ten-year-old in Connecticut jumping into the deep end of rabid NFL television viewing, that's who Steve Sabol was -- the big smiling fella who introduced the Football Follies.

The average fan knew little to nothing about Steve Sabol's "big picture" influence, but behind the scenes, Sabol was the creative horsepower, weaving NFL tales as mediums like home video and cable television began to take over the sports viewing landscape in the 1980s.

(NOTE: The parallels between Steve Sabol and WWE chairman Vince McMahon are astounding. Both were second-generation guys who started out working for their fathers, and both were probably known more to viewers in the '70s and '80s as "announcers" rather than "company owners." Above all else, they both share an unwavering passion for storytelling and creativity, albeit in different genres. I just thought it was an interesting sidebar.)

NFL Films would go on to win 107 sports Emmy Awards, and Steve Sabol would get credit on over a third of those. His father Ed would go into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2011, presented by Steve.

Tuesday, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell mourned the loss of Sabol (courtesy of Yahoo! Sports):

''Steve Sabol was the creative genius behind the remarkable work of NFL Films,'' NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said in a statement from the league confirming Sabol's death. ''Steve's passion for football was matched by his incredible talent and energy. Steve's legacy will be part of the NFL forever. He was a major contributor to the success of the NFL, a man who changed the way we look at football and sports, and a great friend.''

Everybody has their favorite NFL Films innovations or features, and as long as we are eulogizing the man who made football such a thrill to follow, here are a few of mine:

5. Microphones on players and coaches
Of all the major sports, football has the biggest visual challenge in marketing individual players for the simple reason that we never see players' faces when they're on the field of play. It's a minor thing, but eye contact in any walk of life matters, and helmets put the NFL at a personality-marketing disadvantage. However, Sabol's proposal to put microphones on players and coaches gave us everything from Hank Stram's "65 Cross Power Trap"...

...to last weekend's Arian Foster "I Don't Know You, Bro" (which now has proper noun status)...

Most importantly, microphones on players and coaches created characters in which we, the fans, could emotionally invest. And that's what ultimately pays the bills.


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16 comments
kojacksdad
kojacksdad

@SeanCablinasian Mike is a Greek.

mikeag96
mikeag96

@SeanCablinasian Sean you nailed it. I LIVED for Fantastic Finishes an still have an old taped compilation of them ESPN played one time!

CraigHlavaty
CraigHlavaty

@SeanCablinasian Dug your Sabol piece. He was a bigger part of the NFL than people imagine.

BroncosItaly
BroncosItaly

@SeanCablinasian Alcoa fantastic finishes, always a staple of NBC's AFC package during the 80s

FattyFatBastard
FattyFatBastard topcommenter

As good as the Alcoa thing was, I wish they'd bring back IBM's "You make the call."

manxlucky
manxlucky

Every game a clash of titans; every snap an existential moment.  RIP Steve Sabol

russellwing
russellwing

@SeanCablinasian Great post! Damn I miss Alcoa fantastic finishes (and IBM's You Make the Call too).

IrishMik
IrishMik

@SeanCablinasian @HoustonPress 65 toss power trap!!!!

SeanCablinasian
SeanCablinasian

@mikeag96 Those were a staple of my childhood football watching days, Mike. Great stuff.

SeanCablinasian
SeanCablinasian

@CraigHlavaty Thanks man. 2nd behind Rozelle in historical influence. I firmly believe that.

ctemple75
ctemple75

@SeanCablinasian Moreso than Halas?

CraigHlavaty
CraigHlavaty

@SeanCablinasian It's the guys that pull the strings that make the NFL work, not just the players. I wish people saw that.

SeanCablinasian
SeanCablinasian

@CraigHlavaty Compared it to the Sopranos and David Chase today. W/ no David Chase there is no Tony, no Paulie, no Chrissy.

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