Drought vs. Tropical Storm: Whose Side Are You On? Take Our Poll

Categories: Weather

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Careful what you wish for.
There's a 70 percent chance a tropical storm will develop in the Gulf in Mexico's Bay of Campeche.

Computer models show a chance it could drift northward, strengthening and possibly becoming a large hurricane aimed at New Orleans or points east.

It won't come to Texas, the experts seem to agree, because of the huge dome of high pressure that is feeding the ongoing drought. That's why Lee didn't come near here.

Is this a good thing?

As the drought drags on, more and more people are wishing for a tropical storm to dump some rain and give hope to trees, lawns and foundations struggling to survive.

The trouble is, tropical storms don't always come in nicely packaged gifts that include relatively low winds, manageable rainfall and no loitering.

You start out wanting some tropical rain, you can end up with 20 inches if a storm stalls.

Some are willing to take the chance. (Not, of course, that there's anything they or anyone can do about it.) To be honest, we're still too spooked from Tropical Storm Allison and its aftermath to ever wish for any tropical disturbance to go near Houston.

But we get the feeling we're part of a quickly shrinking minority. There are only two or three weeks left in Houston's hurricane season -- are you wanting to get hit? Take your chances that the small, quick-moving storm you're hoping for doesn't blow up into a Cat 4?


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8 comments
RW
RW

I'm with you guys. The only thing worse than half or state being on fire, is half the state being on fire while the half is totally underwater.

Tunnel Mole
Tunnel Mole

I realize this was in service of sarcastic humor, but please don't EVER lump Rick Perry in with God, ever ever again.

bibulb
bibulb

And if we got a tropical storm (or worse), most of what we got would just run off before the ground could take it back in. 

I'm down with the sentiment, but I just don't think it'd be that helpful in practice.

Skippy
Skippy

No thanks to either TS or hurricane. Kinda figure the high pressure system would have to move off a bit or weaken for one to come in here. Either way we're looking at a potential repeat of the whole Allison nightmare scenario of the storm getting bounced back & the rain bands training back over us for a second inundation of rain, after the initial pass. I'd rather live with my dead, brown lawn than rip sheetrock & flooring out of my flood damaged house.  

Allison B.
Allison B.

Oh Lord, never Rick Perry. He should go campaign so we can get some stuff done around this state.

Jeff
Jeff

Tropical storm? Yes. Hurricane? No thanks.

Jeff
Jeff

Allison was an EXTREMELY unique situation. A normal tropical storm that passed through the area wouldn't be the worst thing to ever happen, but not a hurricane.

Skippy
Skippy

The key words there are "passed through the area". If the high merely backs away enough from the coast to allow the TS to move on shore here, but doesn't move far enough off the coast, then we run the risk of the TS not being able to pass through and stalling in the area. If someone could guarantee that it would just pass through, then I'd be all for it. But no one can make that guarantee for certain.    

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