Five Great Examples Of Scorsese Using Rock Music, And A Chance to Win Free Shutter Island Passes

Categories: Movies
Martin Scorsese's Shutter Island opens next week -- check at the end of this item for a chance to win preview passes -- and the question is, what's the soundtrack gonna be?

If there's one guy who knows how to blend classic rock into a movie, it's Scorsese. Shutter Island, of course, looks to be more of a Bernard Hermann-type thing than a rock jukebox, but you can always hope it includes a scene where the music is as wonderfully integrated as in these five scenes.

"Gimme Shelter" is a Scorsese favorite -- he's used it in three films. Some prefer it in Goodfellas....



While others like it in The Departed.



Scorsese used Warren Zevon's "Werewolves of London" to great effect in The Color of Money, unfortunately further cementing Zevon in the minds of the unwashed as a novelty-song guy.



Scorsese started it all with Mean Streets, where Robert DeNiro stumbled into the bar to the strains of "Street Fighting Man"; Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore memorably opened with Mott's "All the Way to Memphis" and Casino revived Devo's version of "(I Can't Get No)Satsifaction."

But it's Goodfellas where it all came together. There was the montage of a coked-up Ray Liotta scarmbling all over town doing errands, to the medley of seemingly dozens of songs, and there were these two great moments. The coda to Layla, more blood-soaked than Eric Clapton could ever imagine it could be...



And the Crystals' classic "And Then He Kissed Me," the one of the tracking shots of all time.


You got better examples?

Want to win a pair of passes to Shutter Island? Be among the first ten people to e-mail hairballscontest@houstonpress.com with "Shutter Island" in the header. The screening is February 18.

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