Lawsuit Filed to Block Texas Abortion Law: If You Can't Beat 'em, Sue 'em

Categories: Courts

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Photo by Francisco Montes
Abortion rights groups get litigious about Texas abortion law

If you thought we were done talking about abortion around the Lone Star State, you obviously haven't been paying attention. As Sen. Wendy Davis gears up for her big gubernatorial run, the abortion legislation that sparked her star-making filibuster in the state legislature has been slapped with a federal lawsuit filed in Austin on Friday.

Women's health groups and abortion-rights organizations, including Planned Parenthood, filed the lawsuit to block the new stricter abortion laws before they kick in October 29.

Whole Women's Health, which owns abortion clinics in five Texas cities, is the lead plaintiff in the suit which also was joined by the American Civil Liberties Union of Texas and the Center for Reproductive Rights, a New York-based reproductive rights advocacy group, according to the Austin American-Statesman.

The two main provisions of the new law -- a tighter grip on abortion-inducing drugs and requiring all abortions doctors to sign on and get admitting privileges to a hospital -- could close 13 of the 36 abortion clinics in Texas, according to Jim George, the lawyer who filed the suit. (So yeah that's also the part of the law his lawsuit is going after.) The lawsuit isn't taking on the ban on abortions once you've reached 20 weeks and it can't legally tackle the requirement that all abortion clinics hold up to ambulatory surgical center standards until the actual rules are posted, sometime in January, according to the Texas Tribune.

Though the suit isn't taking on the entire law, it's still moving moving the abortion fight back into the ring in the Lone Star State. Those against the legislation have obviously learned a lesson from all the protesting and Davis's filibuster over the summer: If you can't beat 'em in the lege, sue 'em in the courts.


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1 comments
Jerise Harris-Henson
Jerise Harris-Henson

I think they have a case with the mifroprostol (sp?) drugs and the new restrictions. Those drugs have been deemed safe for early termination up to 9.5 weeks so the 7 week limit is really ridiculous. Considering most doctors won't even see you for a pregnancy confirmation until you are 6 weeks, having only one week to have 3 medical appointments is a bit much. I am not sure about the admitting privileges piece but I also think they have grounds there but who knows. I see this going all the way to DC.

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