Jeremy Lin vs. Yao Ming: The Breakdown

Categories: Basketball, Sports

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It's showdown time.
NBA executives are beaming these days with the Tim Tebow-like mania for the Knicks' Jeremy Lin, a Harvard grad whose family comes from Taiwan.

Not only is Lin getting hysteria in the States, but he is reawakening visions of opening the lucrative Chinese and Asian market back to the NBA, dreams which had faltered with the retirement of the Rockets' Yao Ming.

Lin vs. Yao: Who wins? Obviously they play two very different positions, but there are comparables.

And we're the ones to rate them, as our chart shows.

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12 comments
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Your analysis for Assist is incredibly rude and offensive.

Craigley
Craigley

The winner is the one who plays basketball at MSG.

MSG.  The irony is delicious. 

Honcho
Honcho

in the grand scheme of things, considering that  Lin is likely a flash in the wok, moving him to free space for Dalambert is fine. Granted, there were likely others on the Rockets roster who could have been dumped, but no one saw this coming. And Lin is already starting to look a bit more human. And how many PGs did the Rockets need? We've already got two pretty good ones.

Jimbo
Jimbo

Love the use of the wok gag Honcho. Do you do a similar line in watermelon and fried chicken gags or do you limit yourself to Asians?

Craigley
Craigley

He could have included an MSG joke! 

Honcho
Honcho

it was tongue-in-cheek – and otherwise, is it really offensive? simply relating a Western idiom to his cultural heritage. aren't woks used in Asian cooking? there's nothing derogatory about it.

Craigley
Craigley

You nailed it.  The fact that he's an "Asian Sensation" because he can actually shoot and dribble in itself does not seem right.  

Honcho
Honcho

Point taken, but there's a flaw in your argument. This has nothing to do with stereotyping.

Associating fried chicken and watermelon with African Americans is a racial stereotype. Using the term "wok" in association with Lin is not racial stereotyping. I was merely paralleling a typically Asian or Far Eastern cooking utensil (wok) with its Western counterpart (frying pan).

I am of Italian American descent. If I heard or read the phrase, "The Proof is in the Pasta," I would not be offended. Same parallel. But if I'm called a Wop, or accused of being in the Mafia, then we're skating on thinner ice.

If you're Asian American and find this offensive, then I can't argue with your personal interpretation. It's like the "what is pornography?" question. You know it when you see it. But if I would have called him a bad driver (not the basketball kind), then we're into stereotyping.

I did not call anyone a Sl**t Eye, G**k, Slo*e or make reference to post Civil War railroad labor. Nor would I. It was merely a play on words.

And one final thought: if Lin WERE NOT Chinese American, then his story would be far less relevant. Not that I am saying one should be allowed to throw caution to the wind regarding his ethnicity, BUT it IS a reason he has become a star. So giving a tip of the cap to that heritage – in a light-hearted manner – is not offensive in my book.

Jimbo
Jimbo

No, not offensive at all. In the same way neither would analogies to watermelons and fried chicken be offensive to African Americans right. After all, isn't fried chicken a popular food in African American culture? The question is would you use that analogy as easily? My point is that we seem to use throwaway ethnic stereotypes with Asian Americans that we would never consider using for other ethnicities.

MM
MM

I remember Yao started out promising too...

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