Should We Stop Saying Remember the Alamo?

Categories: Texas

texas-flag.jpg
We're not exactly subtle in Texas.
There are quite a number of catchphrases that can be attributed to the Lone Star state. Among them, "Houston, we have a problem," "Don't mess with Texas" and "Who shot J.R.?" evoke a range of responses. Certainly, our colloquialisms are as unique as the state itself. But, perhaps the most well known is "Remember the Alamo," the battle cry of soldiers fighting for Texas independence from Mexico 175 years ago.

Apparently, the battle is still raging, at least for some, and ground zero is the Rio Grande Guardian. This time, however, the battle is not for independence, but over whether or not anyone should even be using the phrase, "Remember the Alamo."

Jeff Wentworth, a Republican state senator from San Antonio, recently penned an op-ed column for the paper and it didn't sit well with civil rights activist Jose Antonio Lopez, who calls the piece "xenophobic" and says the phrase is a "a senseless grudge against the memory and integrity of our Spanish Mexican ancestors who died fighting on both sides, no different than in any other civil war."

The subliminal message in your article is unmistakably divisive. It's meant to strike fear in Anglo Texans against the increasing browning of the population in Texas. Senator, the rise in the number of Hispanic Texans is inevitable and a natural process. Remember that Tejanos held that distinction when the waves of mostly illegal immigrant Anglos flooded into Texas in 1835-36.

Lopez goes on to refer to Texas as "New Spain" rather than "New England."

Wentworth's column, while not quite as filled with rhetoric as Lopez's, was more hyperbole than history. Frankly, the conservative senator's viewpoint sounded a little like a Michael Bay movie.

The stench of the burning bodies mixed with the lingering smell of gun powder, blood, and sweat from the pre-dawn battle.

No Christian burial or prayers. No flag-draped coffins or 21-gun salutes. No bagpipes playing "Amazing Grace" or bugles sounding taps. Just the roar of the flames and the shadows of buzzards circling overhead.

Oh, brother. We're more inclined to forgive the politician's missteps than we are his movie trailer voice-over script. Neither column was short on colorful language, which, at the very least, made this minor skirmish an entertaining read.


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prospector5
prospector5

Should we remember the Alamo? Absolutely. If it were not for the 186 who died, It's possible that the drug wars, corruption and poverty would cover twice the land area it does now. Sadfor Mexico? Maybe. But better for everyone who lives in the states gained in the war withMexico.The millions of Mexican immigrants coming to this country have voted by their presence here. We can only hope that Mexico will overcome it's problems. Historically,the Spanish invaded Mexico and took the land from the Indians, before we took--and bought the land from them. We certainly should not forget the incredible courage of the men whosacrificed their lives in the Alamo.

ILOVETX
ILOVETX

MMM... Jose Antonio Lopez.... any relation with Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna????

Demerso6
Demerso6

Maybe he was stoned during History class

Rlum401
Rlum401

You my friend are a dumbass I had family fight at both major engagements for Texas independence( Alamo and San jacinto). The hell with anyone that doesnt love or respect this state and all you wetbacks can kiss my ass

Dave Mundy
Dave Mundy

Many brave Tejanos died at Goliad and at the Alamo. When I say "Remember the Alamo!" I salute them along with everyone else who paid the ultimate price for freedom.If Jose Antonio Lopez wants to deny his Texas heritage, perhaps he would feel more comfortable back in the land of his ancestors.

PattyT
PattyT

Uh...actually, that was 175 years ago, not 250.

Jeff
Jeff

Thanks for the correction. Math was not my strong suit yesterday. :)

James
James

If you talk to enough Mexicans that live in Mexico you'll learn that they believe that Texas was given to us as a gift by the Mexican people. It was the strangest thing I'd ever heard, but person after person told me that.

ILOVETX
ILOVETX

They tell you that because that is what is been taught at Mexican schools. I know that for a fact.

Evan
Evan

Why does nobody remember the Maine?

prospector5
prospector5

It was the Spanish-American war many years later.

Border/Culture/Language
Border/Culture/Language

"...the waves of mostly illegal immigrant Anglos flooded into Texas in 1835-36"

Is he actually saying this with a straight face?? Another illegal alien apologists making excuse after excuse why 15 MILLION of them are here? Not going to work, Lopez.

big red
big red

Lopez is an idiot. More Mexicans cross the border daily than the entire number of anglos who moved to Texas. And notice how he conveniently leaves out a couple of facts against his stand. Like placing the colonists between the Comanches and the Mexican population centers. The colonists were to serve as a buffer against the Indians who the Mexicans could not defeat. And he fails to point out that for many years Mexicans crossed the border into what is now New Mexico and enslaved Indians who they then took back to Mexico.

stwilhelm
stwilhelm

No matter what some would like to do, we cannot change history. My history involves The Alamo and I for one, will never give up saying "Remember the Alamo". I, for one, do not believe in revisionist history -- take it or leave it -- history is what it is and it has made our nation stronger. So, "Remember the Alamo", "Don't Tread on Me", "The British are Coming", etc. --

Native Texan
Native Texan

Yeah, but got our asses handed to us. Maybe we should only say, "Remember the Alamo" while holding our thumb and forefinger up to our foreheads in an "L" shape.

prospector5
prospector5

Right. Probably 1500 Mexican soldiers died and 186 Texans died. And I salute every onethat died for freedom.

Marksthespot33
Marksthespot33

The Alamo, like Pearl Harbor in WWII or Bunker Hill, Kipps Bay and many of the early battles in the Revolutionary War, while lost, served as rallying points to bring us to victory. THAT is the point. The value of The Battle of the Alamo isn't lessened simply because we lost. Just like another famous battle that The Alamo is often compared to, the Greeks at Thermopylae. While the battle was lost, it served as an important delaying action, giving the ultimate victors time to consolidate forces,the strategic advantage to select the ground(s) on which future battles would be fought and more importantly the will to persevere in the struggle for liberty,freedom, etc. In other words, your oversimplification of "we got our asses handed to us", which makes us losers("L" to the forehead) line of thought doesn't do justice to what was actually accomplished by the selfless sacrifice of Texian AND Tejano defenders of the Alamo. Moreover, it insults the memory of those courageous souls. Without the defeat at the Alamo, Texas may very well have remained a part of Mexico today or at the very least, the Mexican American War 10 years later.

DontyoumeanNativeTroll?
DontyoumeanNativeTroll?

Crack a history book (if you can figure out how to open it) 260 alamo defenders vs 2400 Mexican troops

DontyoumeanNativeTroll?
DontyoumeanNativeTroll?

Of course I am. The men bravely fought off a force almost 10 times their size for 13 days.Think about that as you sit there in your comfortable office typing vicious lies downplaying the events that occurred those 13 days. We aren't talking about a game of pick-up basketball here.

Native Texan
Native Texan

Are you implying that we DIDN'T get our asses handed to us?

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