Ramen Documentary to Premiere in Houston

10156160_10151935619126076_1950944630_n.jpg
Photo courtesy Spilled
Get ready for Carl Rosa's ramen documentary.
If you're tired of hearing about ramen, stop reading right now. The craze isn't dying down anytime soon. In fact, many think that, at least here in Houston, it's just getting started, and we're about to go even more gaga over the Japanese soup, thanks to Carl Rosa, founder and president of the Sushi Club of Houston, and his new film, Spilled: A Documentary About Real Ramen.

This morning, Rosa released the trailer on the Ramen in Common Facebook group, and various Spilled websites went live, a move that will probably increase the local demand for the dish, which was once largely thought of as college-dorm fare in the United States. Rosa is crazy about all things Japanese--particularly the food--and he spends his days teaching Americans about the ins and outs of Japanese culture and cuisine. He's already tackled sushi in Houston, so now he's onto the next big thing: Ramen.


More »

Top 5 Foods & Drink to Binge on While (Also) Bingeing on 'House of Cards'

ApplePie1.jpg
Photo by Christopher Twigg
"A slice of pie is good for the soul."

For a significant number of Americans, February 14, 2014, was more than just Valentine's Day. The day's primary significance was not the annual celebration of our national Hallmark-sanctioned loveliest, but the release of the full second season of House of Cards. What's House of Cards? Okay, just stop reading now and hit yourself with a brick for not watching one of the best shows on television. Everyone else, get in the spirit with these five theme food and drinks. [Warning: some minor spoilers.]

5. Water. "Clean water," of course, since the "Clean Water Initiative" is Claire Underwood's baby (metaphorical and symbolic since she gave up having kids -- get it, get it? Okay, I'll stop.) And while water is a rather boring party libation, you'll thank me later, given the salty foods and other less salubrious beverages that follow on this list.

4. Steak. More specifically, a steak of "soy-fed Nagasaki beef," which goes for "200 bucks a pound," or so claims Raymond Tusk in season 2, episode 8. At that price, I'm not throwing my steak in the pool to be fetched by a dog like Frank did, but then again, seasoned cow flesh has always been my Achilles heel.


More »

Films for Foodies: Waitress

Categories: Food in Film

Waitress2.jpg
Film still from Waitress
Feeling blue? Make some pie!
Movie studios scramble to have big-name stars headline their films, but in many of my favorite movies, food is the star. Few things are better than pairing a foodie film with a great meal so we can enjoy ourselves just as much as the folks onscreen are enjoying their own aliments. In this series, we'll highlight a movie in which food plays a leading role and suggest one or more local spots to provide an accompanying feast for you. Pull up a table and dim the lights, the show's about to begin.

Waitress (2007)

Synopsis
Waitress was originally an independent film shown at Sundance, but it was so well received that Fox Searchlight Pictures acquired the rights and distributed it across the country. So if you've seen it, thank Fox.

The story takes place in a small town in the Deep South, where Jenna (Keri Russell) is a waitress at Joe's Pie Diner, owned by the gruff and curmudgeonly Joe (Andy Griffith). At Joe's, Jenna gets to flex her creative muscle by inventing unique pies, often inspired by her life, like the "I Hate My Husband" pie, because, well, she does.


More »

Dude! Alamo Drafthouse Introduces Cocktails to Pair With Your Favorite Films

adcocktails.JPG
Photos by Kaitlin Steinberg
Left to right: The Getaway, Dark & Stormy, Manhattan and The Clooney margarita.
Nothing pairs better with drinks than the right food. Except maybe movies.

From the White Russians in The Big Lebowski to martinis in any (and all) James Bond films to the French 75, which rose to fame after its mention in Casablanca, films and cocktails have a long, mouthwatering history. Alamo Drafthouse is paying tribute to movies through booze starting this month with a new cocktail program.

If you've ever seen a movie at Alamo Drafthouse, you know the place has a lengthy food menu and a great wine and craft beer selection, but today is the first day you can see a movie at the theater, liquor in hand. Other Alamo Drafthouse locations in Austin started their cocktail program first, and it was a such a hit that our local bartenders traveled there to train and create a unique cocktail menu for the two Houston locations.

There are currently 12 cocktails and four loaded milkshakes on the menu, but the local bartenders and Bill Norris, a mixologist for Alamo Drafthouse corporate, are developing new drinks to pair with films all the time.

More »

Films for Foodies: Eat Pray Love, in Which an Annoying Character Eats Great Food

Categories: Food in Film

EatPrayLove1.jpg
Photo courtesy Eat Pray Love
It's a hokey film, but the food and scenery are incredible.
Movie studios scramble to have big-name stars headline their films, but in many of my favorite movies food is the star. Few things are better than pairing a foodie film with a great meal so we can enjoy ourselves just as much as the folks onscreen are enjoying their own aliments. In this series, we'll highlight a movie in which food plays a leading role and suggest one or more local spots that can provide an accompanying feast for you. Pull up a table and dim the lights, the show's about to begin.

Eat Pray Love (2010)

Synopsis
Eat Pray Love is based on the autobiographical novel by Elizabeth Gilbert. The film opens with Liz (Julia Roberts) in Bali, riding her bike to see a healer, who tells her she will have two marriages, will lose all her money but get it back again, and will return to Bali someday to teach him English.

The film then cuts to New York, where Gilbert is at a party. Though she has a successful career, a loving husband (Billy Crudup), a house, savings and anything else the modern woman could want, Gilbert finds herself unhappy with her life. In the middle of the night, she gets out of bed and prays, not really knowing how, and she hears God tell her to go back to bed. When she lies down again next to her husband, he says he doesn't want to leave New York. Gilbert says she doesn't want to be married.

The couple separates, and Gilbert begins dating an actor, David (James Franco), who tells her that his inner peace and calm are the result of his relationship with his guru, whom he met in India. Gilbert decides that she needs to take some time off to travel. She plans to go to Italy, then to India to meet the guru, then finally to Bali to see the healer again, hoping to find herself somewhere along the way.


More »

Celebrate the Return of Downton Abbey With These 5 Foods and Drinks

cottagepiedownton.jpg
Photo by Charlotte Coneybeer
Shepherd's -- aka "Cottage" -- Pie

While Downton Abbey isn't ostensibly a 'foodie' show, I still can't watch it without getting a bit peckish. All that blather about inheritance and estate upkeep that goes on during these dinner scenes can't distract me from mooning over the exquisite china and decadent meals. Season 4 is in full swing, and to celebrate I'm noshing on these five Downtown Abbey-inspired foods and drinks.

5. Oysters on the Half Shell. Grand Downton dinners comprised many, many courses, and seafood was almost always featured earlier rather than later in the meal as palate preparation for heavier proteins. Oysters, by far the most popular shellfish during this period, were usually served on the half shell, often with a simple dressing. If shucking, cleaning, and preparing your own bivalves at home makes you want to swoon, I suggest letting Liberty Kitchen or Brasserie 19 do the work for you.

4. Shepherd's (Cottage) Pie. More a "downstairs" rather than "upstairs" meal, shepherd's pie (also known as "cottage pie") was popular working-class fare not only because its combination of potatoes, dark meat, and root vegetables made for hearty fuel, but also because it could be made easily from leftovers. Given Downton is airing during the winter in the U.S., this warm comfort food is particularly fitting for a Sunday-night viewing potluck.


More »

Films for Foodies (and Winos): Sideways

large-sideways1.jpg
Film still from Sideways
MIles, left, teaches Jack, right, how to taste wine with your eyes.
Movie studios scramble to have big-name stars headline their films, but in many of my favorite movies, food is the star. Few things are better than pairing a foodie film with a great meal so we can enjoy ourselves just as much as the folks onscreen are enjoying their own aliments. In this series, we'll highlight a movie in which food plays a leading role and suggest one or more local spots to provide an accompanying feast for you. Pull up a table and dim the lights, the show's about to begin.

Sideways (2004)

Synopsis
Ah, the road-trip film. Road trips are a staple of cinematic plot lines, and Sideways offers up an alternately depressing and hilarious one set against the backdrop of the beautiful Santa Ynez Valley.

Miles Raymond (Paul Giamatti) is a depressed, divorced, borderline alcoholic writer and wine-lover who embarks on a weeklong trip with his buddy, Jack (Thomas Hayden Church), a failed actor. Jack is soon to be married, and Miles, the best man, wants to go on a trip through wine country for a relaxing bachelor party, and Jack wants one last fling before he's a married man, so the two decide to hit the road in Miles's convertible and tour a few wineries with which Miles, a veritable wino, is already fairly familiar.

During the trip, they stop at the Hitching Post, a restaurant where Miles has often come to eat and to admire Maya (Virginia Madsen), a waitress. With Jack's help, he strikes up a conversation with Maya and finally gets to know more about her. The next day, Jack and Miles meet Stephanie (Sandra Oh), a pour girl at a local winery, and upon discovering that she and Maya are friends, the men arrange a double date.


More »

Stay Classy and Get Ready for Anchorman 2 With This Eating and (Mostly) Drinking Plan

The.BurgundyHornitos.jpeg
Photo courtesy of Hornitos
The Burgundy cocktail

In case you haven't seen any of part of one of the most innovative promotional campaigns of all time, Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues opens in theaters this weekend.

That's right, Ron Burgundy, America's most obtuse albeit intrepid news anchor, is returning to the big screen. Apparently, the sequel will chronicle Burgundy's foray into the world of 24-hour news. Hilarity, I'm sure, will ensue.

But so might hunger! To get you in the mood for viewing Anchorman 2, here's a Ron Burgundy-inspired menu that will help you stay classy and satiated. Note: I don't actually recommend consuming the subsequent comestibles right before the movie. Night before, rather. Why?


More »

Films for Foodies: Remy the Cooking French Rat Makes Good in 'Ratatouille'

Categories: Food in Film

cp_FWB_Ratatouille_20120926.jpg
Photo courtesy Disney Pixar
Join Chef Linguini and Remy the rat for a delightful culinary adventure.
Movie studios scramble to get big-name stars headline their films, but in many of my favorite movies food is the star. Few things are better than pairing a foodie film with a great meal so we can enjoy ourselves just as much as the folks onscreen are enjoying their own aliments. In this series, we'll highlight a movie in which food plays a leading role and suggest one or more local spots to provide an accompanying feast for you. Pull up a table and dim the lights, the show's about to begin.

Ratatouille (2007)

Synopsis
This Disney and Pixar film was a hit among both children and adults when it was released in 2007. The film is set in France and stars Remy, a rat, who begins the story by narrating his life and explaining how he has highly developed senses of taste and smell, which sometimes alienate him from his garbage-eating rat peers. He dreams of being a chef, and his idol is the recently deceased master chef Auguste Gusteau. When Remy becomes separated from his fellow rats in the sewers, he finds himself at Gusteau's restaurant in Paris and decides to help out a floundering new garbage boy, Linguini, who has inadvertently ruined a pot of soup. Remy uses his cooking skills to fix Linguini's errors, creating a new type of soup.

Linguini catches Remy, and while Linguini is being yelled at by the head chef, Skinner, for trying to cook, the soup is accidentally served to customers who, it turns out, love it. Skinner hires Linguini as a chef on the condition that he re-create the soup and kill the rat that he trapped in the kitchen. Linguini cannot bring himself to kill the rat, and he discovers that not only can he communicate with Remy, but it was Remy who saved the soup. Remy and Linguini become a cooking team, with the rat controlling the human's movements by pulling on his hair, like a puppet master controlling a marionette.


More »

Films for Foodies: Big Night Takes Italian Cuisine to Cinematic Heights

Categories: Food in Film

bignight.jpg
They've got one night to prove themselves with lots of delicious food...
Movie studios scramble to have big-name stars headline their films, but in many of my favorite movies food is the star. Few things are better than pairing a foodie film with a great meal so we can enjoy ourselves just as much as the folks onscreen are enjoying their own aliments. In this series, we'll highlight a movie in which food plays a leading role and suggest one or more local spots that can provide an accompanying feast for you. Pull up a table and dim the lights, the show's about to begin.

Big Night (1996)

Synopsis
On the Jersey Shore in the 1950s, two Italian brothers, Primo (Tony Shalhoub) and Secondo (Stanley Tucci), battle it out in the kitchen and the dining room to keep their failing restaurant afloat. Primo is the older brother and the chef, while Secondo manages the front of the house. Though the restaurant, Paradise, serves excellent, authentic Italian food, the mid-century American diners just don't get it, so the brothers must decide whether to cut their losses and return to work for a successful uncle in Italy or keep trying to make the restaurant work.

Secondo has a lovely and devoted girlfriend, Phyllis (Minnie Driver), but because of his work woes, he's unable to commit fully to her. He ends up having an affair with Gabriella (Isabella Rossellini), the wife of a competitor, Pascal (Ian Holm). Pascal's eponymous restaurant is hugely successful, so the brothers turn to him for a loan. Pascal offers to hire the brothers at his own restaurant, but they are too proud to accept. In a gesture of apparent goodwill, Pascal finally agrees to bring the famous jazz singer Louis Prima to Paradise when he's in town, suggesting that a celebrity's endorsement could revive the restaurant. The brothers set out to prepare for one stellar evening to show Prima and everyone else what they're made of.

This, then, is the titular "Big Night."


More »

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

Loading...