Fraudulent Fish: 50 Percent of Seafood Sold in Texas Mislabeled, New Oceana Study Reports

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© Oceana / Jenn Hueting
All ten seafood samples purchased from Texas sushi restaurants, all located in Austin, were mislabeled, according to Oceana's study.
Think that tai sushi you're eating is red snapper? It's far more likely to be tilapia, says Oceana, a Washington, D.C.-based ocean conservancy organization. This isn't a new concern, of course. Former Houston Press food critic Robb Walsh wrote a scathing exposé of the issue back in 2001, "Fish Fraud," in which he documented the red snapper substitutions rampant in Texas. And yet the problem persists.

Last week, Oceana released a new study in which it found 33 percent of the fish samples it analyzed from across the United States were mislabeled. The most frequently swapped-out fish? Snapper and tuna, which had mislabeling rates of 87 percent and 59 percent respectively.

The two-year-long study analyzed 1,215 seafood samples from 674 retail outlets in 21 states, and found that Texas was one of the worst offenders. According to Oceana's data, nearly half the fish sold in retail outlets and restaurants in Texas is mislabeled. The only other areas of the country worse at telling escolar from white tuna were Southern California (52 percent of its samples were mislabeled) and Pennsylvania (56 percent).

These findings echo previous studies done by outlets ranging from Consumer Reports and the Chicago Sun-Times to the University of North Carolina, which found in 2004 that 77 percent of fish being sold as red snapper was actually another species entirely. Mislabeling seafood is illegal, although the Food and Drug Administration -- which is responsible for monitoring this area -- typically focuses its efforts on food safety, not food fraud.

"It is very difficult for consumers to purchase a real red snapper in Austin and Houston," the Oceana study reported. "None of the eight 'red snapper' samples tested were true red snapper; three were tilapia, two were breams and three were less expensive snapper species."

Dr. Kimberley Warner, report author and senior scientist at Oceana, says that although the sample size in Texas was small -- with only five samples from Houston analyzed -- the results were on par with the same seafood fraud that's occurring across the nation, especially in restaurants. While 38 percent of restaurants carried mislabeled fish in Oceana's study, only 18 percent of retail outlets had fish swaps.

"You have stronger labeling requirements in grocery stores," Warner says. "Right up front you see a bit more information about your seafood than on a printed menu." On the other hand, restaurants -- "sushi bars in particular," Warner said -- are worse about mislabeling their seafood and offering that tilapia in place of red snapper, "unless a customer asks a lot of questions."

A whopping 74 percent of sushi restaurants were selling mislabeled fish, which means customers need to be particularly discerning when it comes to ordering their next piece of nigiri -- especially in Texas.

"Every sushi sample purchased in Texas was mislabeled," the study reported. "Escolar was swapped for white tuna in both sushi venues where it was purchased, which is a fish that can cause unpleasant digestive effects in some who eat too much."

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© Oceana / Jenn Hueting
Dr. Warner and her team took over 1,200 seafood samples, carefully preserved and prepared them, then sent them to an independent lab for DNA testing in 2012.
More troubling, however, are the high mercury level swaps, in which fish with high levels of methylmercury are subbed for supposedly safer fish.

"The most egregious substitutions," Warner says, "were king mackerel swapped out as grouper in Florida and tilefish being swapped out as red snapper and halibut in New York."

"Those instances weren't extremely common, but to find them at all was disturbing to me," Warner says. High amounts of methylmercury are typically found in large, predatory fish like black bass, swordfish, king mackerel and tilefish. Excessive consumption of these types of fish can be toxic for certain groups of people, such as pregnant women and children.

And not even salmon, that most recognizable of fish, is safe from swaps, says Warner.

"The kind of salmon fraud that had been reported in the past was farmed salmon being substituted for wild-caught Atlantic salmon," Warner says.

Farmed salmon has been spotlighted in recent years as a poor alternative to its wild-caught kin, for reasons ranging from high concentrations of several cancer-causing substances in the farm-raised fish to the pollution that degrades ocean waters around salmon farms and puts wild-caught populations at risk of disease.

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15 comments
Elouise
Elouise

Before his Fish Fraud piece, Robb Walsh wrote what I consider more of an explosive expose: meats masquerading as other meats. He found one place serving pork loin as 'veal'. Ouch. 

AtaboyLuther
AtaboyLuther

I thought I was eating bluefin tuna.  Who knew it was horse meat?

FattyFatBastard
FattyFatBastard topcommenter

This is why I come here.  I would have never known this was a problem, much less a rampant one.  The question now is how do we solve it?

tiltingwindmills
tiltingwindmills

Solution: go to a real fishmonger like Rose's at the Kemah bridge and look at your fish in the eyes before purchasing it.

Casey Buhrer
Casey Buhrer

Ira Glass had a cool segment on NPR about "imitation calamari".

BertO
BertO

I wonder if self-proclaimed sushi experts like that long-winded fellow who sometimes posts here could tell the difference between various species? I'm sure most sushi eaters who gob their bites with soy and wasabi couldn't tell the difference. And ditto with the throw-the-kitchen-sink-into-a-crunch-roll eaters. 

(not that this excuses such fraudulent labeling) 

Plinkster
Plinkster

I agree with WS Bob.  I buy most of mu fish from Stoops, Airline Seafood and Whole Foods and think I am getting the real thing.  It would be great to see you follow up by reporting what specific Houston retailers are selling.

WestSideBob
WestSideBob topcommenter

As noted, we've seen these reports over the years.  When can we expect the follow-up analysis, by The Press, on Greater H'ton seafood eateries and whether they are selling us the real deal? 

Better yet, how about an undercover investigation of local seafood suppliers? Don't forget the Sysco's of the world either.

J.A.Justice
J.A.Justice

@BertO That long-winded fellow I believe you are speaking about is actually a woman and I highly doubt she could tell a mackerel from river trout.

Anse
Anse

@Plinkster I'm curious about Airline Seafood...that's the one on Richmond, right? I've only been in there once several years ago and it smelled horrible. I mean it stank! I haven't been back since. Was that just a fluke? Is it really a good place? I'd like to check it out again but I still remember the foulness of that one visit.

BertO
BertO

@J.A.Justice @BertO  I meant the President of the Houston Hare Club for Sushi, just forgot his nombre, hombre.

Plinkster
Plinkster

@Anse @Plinkster It is.  We have always had good luck with their products.  Have also seen Monica Pope and Chris Shepard there buying seafood and have to think they they are getting good stuff.  Now, I think it smells like seafood.  Maybe briny would be a good adjective.

But this is good reason for the Press and KC to jump in and find out what people are selling and serving us.

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