Goro & Gun, Houston's First Ramen Shop, Opening Soon Downtown

Categories: Restaurant News

"It is a ramen restaurant, it is a ramen shop, but it is not only that," Martinez teases. "We also will serve things that I love and can't find done well here." One example? Soup dumplings. "I can't find a good soup dumpling here," he says.

Goro & Gun will also serve some of the favorites found on-board Martinez's other project, The Modular food truck. "The bone marrow will make it onto the menu over here."

Also look for a full slate of cocktails, beer, wine and sake at Goro & Gun -- but not hot sake. Martinez doesn't believe in it. "I think we've gotten to a point now where people understand good sake," he says. Rouse and Moore are still pressing him to change his mind. "Maybe we'll say that's a soft no," jokes Rouse.

The bar is the focal point of the narrow space, which will ultimately house 65 people in total. Five of those seats will be at a chef's table, where Coffman will be able to showcase his extracurricular talents each night. "He's not just restricted to Asian food," says Martinez. "If he wants to do shrimp and grits, he can do shrimp and grits," he says by way of example.

Goro & Gun 002.jpg
Brass sconces were rescued from the Houston Club.
The rest of the seats will hug the long, broad bar or the brick walls, in the form of both pub-height tables and black banquettes. There are only 15 inches of space behind the bar to put in shelving, so Goro & Gun will build up: ceiling-height shelves will span nearly the entire wall on one side, with a library ladder built in to reach the highest parts.

If that layout seems familiar, Rouse says that it's intentional. He and Martinez drew inspiration for the narrow, high-ceilinged restaurant from Rickhouse in San Francisco, a similarly laid-out space managed by former Houston bartender Claire Sprouse -- a friend of the Goro & Gun team.

With the bar as such a main element in the small space, patrons may think at first that Goro & Gun is simply that: a bar, and nothing else. Martinez and Rouse want to emphasize that it's more than that.

"It's a restaurant," says Martinez. "A bar," says Rouse at nearly the same time. They both laugh. "It's everything," says Martinez.

"We want you to come in to eat, but feel comfortable sitting at a bar and eating," says Rouse. "All of us like sitting at the bar to eat."



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25 comments
chetbellman
chetbellman

Excited by this, it is way overdue. Simplicity defined.

Gregory M. Buchold
Gregory M. Buchold

I think MFAH will be showing Tampopo on their "Meals on Reels" series when it opens

overmatt
overmatt

"We also will serve things that I love and can't find done well here." One example? Soup dumplings. "I can't find a good soup dumpling here," he says.

IMHO the soup dumplings at Fu Fu Cafe are pretty good.

Pretty excited about this opening, the Market Sq area is shaping up nicely

Houston Press
Houston Press

Chris Dupla, here's a basic breakdown: Pho noodles are long, thin, straight, Vietnamese-style rice noodles. Ramen noodles are shorter, curly, Chinese-style wheat noodles that sometimes also have egg in them. They're richer tasting and have more body to them than pho noodles do.

nguyenhm17
nguyenhm17

I hope they don't go all avant garde, because I've been wanting a good bowl of ramen in Houston for a long, long time. If they are just going to make some modern noodle soup, as good as it may be they shouldn't call it ramen. 

Being one of my favorite foods ever, I've eaten ramen in Japan, at all the ramen shops in NYC, a bunch of places on the west coast (LA/OC and SF Bay Area) and every time I go somewhere near a Mitsuwa market I stop by Santouka Ramen in their food court, which IMO has the best ramen in the United States.

To me, if you call it ramen, you are setting certain expectations and asking to be compared to all those places, so the execution has to be spot on. The statement that they are going to try making their own noodles gives me some pause, many of the top ramen places in the US import their noodles from Japan.

That said, I can't wait for Goro & Gun to open.

Chris Dupla
Chris Dupla

forgive my ignorance, but what is the difference from Ramen noodles and Pho noodles?

Audrey Carreón
Audrey Carreón

Ooo, they also said they will have soup dumplings! Yum!

Yamaha Hoda
Yamaha Hoda

www.jwjmeypiyb.gomakemoney120.info/tvpnv.kwliq

Sarah Belham
Sarah Belham

Tony, the 5-for-$1 ramen is to real ramen as a no-name chocolate Santa from the dollar store is to Godiva.

Houston Press
Houston Press

Tony Gutierrez, have you ever had freshly made ramen noodles in a thick, nutty broth made from slow-boiled pork bones? It's like pho on steroids. So amazing.

jimbo1126
jimbo1126

I think of all the restaurants opening this spring, this is the one that most excites me. It was by accident that I "discovered" ramen in NYC, happening upon a place called Ippudo and deciding to try it. It was amazing stuff, and once home, saw a tweet from Alison Cook saying Ippudo was some of, if not the, best ramen in the U.S. I'm sure Goro & Gun will be just as comforting.

Irene Sasaki
Irene Sasaki

At least we can dream of the day it opens!

Houston Press
Houston Press

Err, opening soon. Not quite open yet. We just got too excited.

Tony Gutierrez
Tony Gutierrez

A place for hipsters to go pay $6.95 for a package of Ramen...I'll stick to the Kroger 5 for $1 special

jamestda
jamestda

@Gregory M. Buchold tyty!  I was considering buying Tampopo, but who would watch it with me?  Crisis resolved!  So who's going to join me for Tampopo and Goro & GuN!?

kshilcutt
kshilcutt moderator editor

@nguyenhm17 From what Josh told me, they're going to keep it basic: tonkotsu ramen, miso ramen, a vegetable-based ramen and possibly shoyu ramen. When I asked if they were going to get crazy and do inventive ramen,  I got a withering look -- which I took as a good sign.  :)

themodular
themodular

@Tony Gutierrez this old guy is too fat first and too old to be a hipster. but 6.95 for our ramen? i think not. this stuff takes days to just make the stock. try a little more on the price, but well worth every penny. proof is in the pudding or in this case in the soup. 

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