Openings & Closings: Homegrown Burgers on Holcombe

Categories: Restaurant News

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Photo by Groovehouse
Mural of Houston at the new JerryBuilt Homegrown Burgers. See more in our slideshow.
The Hay Merchant officially opened on Wednesday of this week after a few days of friends-and-family service. Greg Morago at the Chronicle braved the crowds at the craft beer bar to sample chef Antoine Ware's menu of lamb sweetbread po-boys and blood sausage queso fundido.

A new Three Brothers Bakery in Memorial opened its doors earlier this week, in a new concept for the 63-year-old bakery. Now run by fifth-generation baker Bobby Jucker, the bakery's new digs don't look all that fancy from the outside but house a café with table service and wi-fi. According to the Chronicle, this will hopefully be the first of several expansions.

Speaking of Three Brothers Bakery, its sweet burger buns will be on full and glorious display at the brand-new JerryBuilt Homegrown Burgers when it has its grand opening tomorrow. The Houston-based burger joint is opening at 3501 W. Holcombe tomorrow, February 18, and features Three Brothers buns on all of its burgers and hot dogs. It also makes all of its fries and sweet potato fries fresh daily, grinds its Niman Ranch meat twice a day, uses mostly organic and local produce when available and supports local charities like Neighborhood Centers. What's not to love?

It looks like someone read our list of the worst restaurant names in Houston: Todai finally changed its name to KPOP Restaurant & Bar, according to B4-U-Eat. The rotisserie has been replaced with a 20-foot-long Argentinean grill, and the Chinese cuisine has been replaced with Korean. KPOP plans to have grand opening specials in place until March 31: On weekdays, lunch at the all-you-can-eat buffet is $12.95 and dinner $19.95. On the weekends, lunch is $14.95 and dinner $22.95.

Two temporary closures are in place right now: BB's Beef & Hot Dog, which has closed its location on West Airport in Stafford but plans to reopen soon in larger digs on Highway 6. And the Love Shack in Cypress, which B4-U-Eat reports "is temporarily closed again for the next two weeks to convert from a residential water well to a commercial well."

Finally, in closings, two old stalwarts have shut their doors: Wok Bo at 12270 Westheimer and Zorro's Buffet at 9501 Southwest Freeway. It seems that the only Zorro's left in Texas is now in Fort Worth, but don't be sad: There's better buffet food to be found here in Houston.



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9 comments
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Good Grief
Good Grief

Nobody is going to miss Wok Bo.

Ed T.
Ed T.

I remember many a business lunch at Wok Bo, back in the days I worked in that area of town.

cuppanoodles
cuppanoodles

I have fond memories of that place from about 20 years ago. Since then I've found better places to carb load at.

tee-wee
tee-wee

" uses mostly organic and local produce when available " It's time to stop letting pr folk feed this kind of garbage to consumers. It is a committment to absolutley nothing. It's like saying we're trying to go green because we like the planet.

wee-tee
wee-tee

It's a commitment to serving a better product to their consumers. 

tee-wee
tee-wee

Actually, a committment to serving better product would actually commit to organic and local produce, or just organic, or just local. That statement says they'll maybe do it when they can. weak.

Katharine Shilcutt
Katharine Shilcutt

Not to get in the middle of this lively discussion, but wee-tee is right: "Not everything is always available." The guys that run JerryBuilt were very up front about what they could and couldn't get locally or grown/produced organically, especially in light of the drought. (Example: They wanted to buy Texas sweet potatoes, but the crop - like the peanut crop - was destroyed by the drought, so they're buying Louisiana sweet potatoes for now.) That speaks volumes to me, instead of just trying to pretend that everything across the board is local/organic.

And not to come swooping to the defense of a new restaurant I barely know, but here's what I don't understand: A place takes the initiative to support as much local/organic is possible, but is penalized for not being local/organic enough. That doesn't make any sense. Nothing is 100% local/organic. Nothing. Anywhere.

Instead of trying to shame a place that's actually trying to make a difference by supporting small businesses and purchasing organic produce where possible, why not direct some of that self-righteousness toward organizations that aren't making any progress in those directions?

tee-wee
tee-wee

I'm excited to try it, and yes, I have bought organic and local from CSA's, farmer's markets, and grocery stores. That said, calling out something that you may do (when possible) in order to associate yourself with a larger movement is cynical. They're not the first or the last to do it, but it's somewhat dishonest. As far as availability, there is something to be said that if it's not available, maybe you shouldn't use it. I'm not a locavore, so it's not how I roll. But then, I don't tell folks that I try to walk that talk.

wee-tee
wee-tee

Have you ever purchased organic and or local products? Not everything is always available. You can't guarantee something if it's not always available. At least they are honest and they are local, not a chain from some other state. 

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