How To: Make Your Own Pizza Dough

peppp3.jpg
Brooke Viggiano
Make homemade pepperoni bread using your own pizza dough.
Being an Italian-American Jersey girl, I've grown up making homemade pizza with my family. Please, no Jersey Shore references -- I beg of you! Coming to Texas, I certainly miss my pizza family. So when I want a taste of home, this pizza dough is the perfect solution.

Crispy and chewy when baked, this dough can be prepared ahead of time and stored in the freezer for up to a month. When you're ready to use, just defrost, let rise, and get started with your pizza creation.

The greatest thing about pizza is that once you have the dough, the possibilities are endless; anything and everything can go on this thing. Seriously, I'm pretty sure you could put chocolate-covered Brussels sprouts on it, smother it in blue cheese and I'd still love it -- anything for pizza! Just add your favorite cheese, some sort of sauce, plus whatever you have lying around the house, and you're golden.

Here's the easiest dough recipe that you can use for pizzas, calzones, pepperoni rolls, spinach bread - you name it!

Pizza Dough

• 1 packet dry active yeast (¼ oz)
• 1 cup warm water
• 2 tsp sugar
• 2 ½ cups all purpose flour
• 1 ½ tsp salt
• 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus more for coating

In a large mixing bowl, activate the yeast by mixing it with ¼ cup warm water (important - must be warm!) and 2 tsp sugar (the yeast's dinner). Let sit until foamy, about 5 minutes. You should be able to see and smell the yeast working - if you don't, start again with another packet.

To the activated mixture, add the flour, salt, 2 tbsp olive oil, and ¾ cup warm water. Mix until dough forms.

On a floured surface, kneed until smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes. Add flour as necessary to keep dough from sticking.

Brush a large bowl with olive oil, add dough and cover with damp towel. Let stand at room temperature until dough has doubled in size, about 2 hours. This is enough for two pizzas or breads, so if you are freezing a portion of the dough, skip this step and do it after you defrost for use.

Once dough has doubled, you're ready to go. Punch the dough down and roll it out to fit your baking sheet or pizza pan (brushed lightly with olive oil). For a crisp crust, bake for 10-12 minutes at 500 degrees. For an even crisper crust, pre-bake for a few minutes before adding toppings.

Mangia!



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21 comments
seenontvspot1
seenontvspot1

Good to know about your information such a very informative and useful ideas i like it you have shared such informative ideas and i want to more info from you by latest update please let us when you review blog.Thanks for sharing with us. Press Dough

FoodyLover
FoodyLover

OMG, I can eat pizza all day and every day. Your descriptive writing makes me want a slice of Ray's. Love it!!

Christina Uticone
Christina Uticone

I'm really impressed with how quickly & easily this crust came together, and how easy it is to toss out thin. I replaced 3/4 cup of the AP flour with whole wheat, which seems like a good ratio to keep it soft and pliable. Thanks for a really useful recipe!

Christine Ha
Christine Ha

Nice post. We cheat and use a breadmaker to make our pizza dough. We like to add beer to the dough--you can taste that bitter effervescence. (And I'm not just saying this because of the Ingredient post I wrote this week.)

Christina Uticone
Christina Uticone

My husband is psyched that tonight is pizza night. Usually he makes the dough, but I told him I saw your recipe & had to give it a go!

I bought him a $32 pizza stone at a Pampered Chef party that I couldn't think of an excuse to get out of--that was over 2 years ago and it's in great shape, even after the move from NY to TX.

Deedles
Deedles

As a pizza lover I am super psyched about making my old time fav a family fun night! 

Riscakes
Riscakes

Used your recipe today and I just wanted to say it came out AMAZING!!  Thanks for the tips!

Jalapeno
Jalapeno

I don't get the frozen part either.  You thaw it at room temperature and leave it there until it doubles in size?

Margin Fades
Margin Fades

Brooke, does this dough do well if frozen, then thawed?  Of course, I'm sure it's best if used fresh.

Megan
Megan

Your pizza bread looks like the stuffed breadsticks we used to get at the late-night pizza joint in college.  Of course, no one ever called them stuffed breadsticks.  They were pizza vaginas.

Bruce R
Bruce R

On top of what you said, I think a pizza stone makes a big difference.

Brooke Viggiano
Brooke Viggiano

I've done it before and it works just fine! Make sure to do the step where you set it in the covered bowl and let the dough rise at room temperature before using.

Ali
Ali

I need to eat a pizza vagina.

Brooke Viggiano
Brooke Viggiano

agreed -a good pizza stone is def on my wish list! any suggestions?

Brooke Viggiano
Brooke Viggiano

Also you can let the dough thaw in the fridge overnight then set it out the next day.

Megan
Megan

I have many fond memories of eating pizza vaginas.  Almost all of the time it was in mixed company.

Shall I continue with the very thin double entendres? :D

Dave Lieberman
Dave Lieberman

Go to Home Depot and buy an unglazed quarry tile for $6 instead of spending $30 on a dedicated pizza stone. It won't last as long before cracking (maybe a year vs. 2 years) but you can buy 5 for the price of one.

Bruce R
Bruce R

I had one of those thin round ones.  It worked well but was kind of small and broke after a dozen or so uses.  Now I use a big, thick, rectangular one. I think it was around $30.  I like it.

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