This Hurricane Season, Stock Up the Right Way

Categories: News

hurricanebear.jpg
Hey, Hurricane Ike Bear; quit dicking around and go buy some bottled water.
Weather agencies across the nation are predicting a much busier hurricane season this year than usual. NOAA predicts up to 10 hurricanes between now and November, with three to six of those being major hurricanes.

Remember Hurricane Ike? Remember living off canned tuna and biting your spouse's head off every time he went to open the fridge after the power went out? Goddammit, we can get at least an extra day's cool air out of it if you'll JUST LEAVE IT ALONE. Let's not go through that again.

Get your Costco card and stock up now, so that you don't have to risk mariticide or long lines and pitchforks at your local Walmart when the next storm starts forming in the Gulf. Below are our suggestions for stockpiling this summer.

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Photo by Abraxas3d
No, not this kind of water.
Water. This can't be emphasized enough. Please stock up on water. Bottled stuff, be-jugged stuff, filtered stuff, however you like to purchase and store water in mass quantities -- just make sure you have lots of water. I also like to fill bathtubs before a storm hits; this is handy for washing off (with washcloths; don't actually get in the tub) and for filling toilet tanks so that you don't have to use your precious bottled water supplies for these activities.

Buy food that's high in protein and complex carbohydrates; you'll need the energy. Cleaning up a storm-damaged house, backyard, carport, etc. can be draining, and you don't want to live off Lay's potato chips while you're doing this. Canned tuna, canned chicken and canned salmon can all be eaten alone or used to make good salads, especially eaten on wheat bread. Granola bars (the healthy kind, please), trail mix, dried fruit and the like are basics.

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Photo by Mark H. Anbinder
Your charcuterie platter will be the envy of the block.
Make sure you have 72 hours worth of food on hand that doesn't require any light or heat to prepare. That often means granola bars, as seen above, but it doesn't have to. Think about cured meats and hard cheeses with olives or dried fruit, or bread covered with butter and slices of avocado. Think outside the box. And, no, butter doesn't need to be refrigerated.

Look through anything you may have stockpiled from last year. What is the use-by date on it? Throw away anything that's expired or has been stored in the heat. Especially get rid of any cans that are dented or look swollen. No one wants botulism on top of a hurricane.

Whatever you buy, make sure that it's capable of being stored at room temperature...and then store it that way. That means don't store your food in the attic, in the garage, in the garden shed, etc. Store it in your house, preferably in a cool, dark place. Under your bed, in a spare closet, in your enormous pantry (I hate you), wherever keeps the food at a steady temperature and out of direct sunlight.

Other thoughts for the days following a hurricane...


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17 comments
Jeff
Jeff

Also, if you have pets, you might consider getting some food for them too...just in case. :)

Christina Uticone
Christina Uticone

Kashi bars are on sale at HEB right now - I grabbed a bunch!

thefifthtaster
thefifthtaster

Flashlights & batteries.  Unless you like going to sleep at 8pm or navigating through your house in total darkness.

scotter
scotter

Or, if you can afford it, ride out the hurricane here, and make sure your property is secured after the storm.  Then, drive to Austin or wherever and wait out the power trucks in cool, air-conditioned comfort in a nice but modest hotel room.  I even took my office computer server and monitor with me and never missed a beat work-wise.  Eleven days of hotel rooms and restaurants was a LOT cheaper than a divorce or criminal defense attorney. 

Big Lance
Big Lance

If the store shelves are empty of bread those final hours prior to the lights going out, go to the baking aisle and get some bread flour and throw it in your bread machine if you have one. We made 3 loaves prior to Rita and we made them last until we had power. Stocking up the freezer with easy to BBQ meats and filling up your propane tank or stocking up on charcoal is a good way to make friends with the neighbors. After Ike, neighbors were making brownies, popcorn & spaghetti on their grills.

ftexas
ftexas

Don't forget the t.p. and cash.

captain caveman
captain caveman

don't forget charcoal and cigarettes. if your local c-store has no power after a storm, these may be hard to come by.  and maybe even hit up your grass dealer for an extra bag a few days before the storm. he'll probably be so stoned he won't even know a Cat 5 is on the way. and get extra papers, too

Ali
Ali

Something I found to be handy was cans of cheddar cheese soup. I had a gas stove so I could cook pasta and my parents had a freezer full of meat (powered by a generator.) We'd go raid their meat, grill it, and have mac and cheese with it. Or make a hash with pasta, cheese soup and ground beef. 

Rice is great, too, with cream of chicken soup or cream of mushroom. 

Serena
Serena

I was without power for nine days after Hurricane Ike. I wanted a warm meal, so I took a pan, put it over the gas fireplace starter and heated up my food. Granted, it was a meal of Beefaroni (which I can no longer even look at), but at least it was something other than room temperature.

Texmex01
Texmex01

and invest in a good high quality cooler, these new Igloos/Yetis will hold temp for days, it is an investment now, but worth twice the price when you need them!

Chencia Higgins
Chencia Higgins

I hear Sam's Club calling my name. I never thought about cured meats but man oh man do I love me some summer sausage! These tips where great, thanks.

Kylejack
Kylejack

I miss Hurricane Ike Bear. He was the coolest.

Mpblack
Mpblack

I felt so smug having a gas cooktop after Ike. After it heated up the house cooking dinner, I never used it again. That's also when I realized my dishwasher won't work. I located restaurants with power (and A/C) real quick.

Ali
Ali

We hit up a lot of restaurants, too. But we were out for 12 days and we was po' folk back then with one of us working an hourly wage job that didn't have power for 15 days. No power = no work = no money = real sucky.

Katharine Shilcutt
Katharine Shilcutt

Good point, re: stocking up on paper plates and plastic silverware. I completely forgot to include that above, but YES. Paper plates, napkins and plastic utensils were invaluable to me after Ike.

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