Kosher Coke: The Real Real Thing

Categories: Beverages

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Often I pop into Belden's in Meyerland because it's a throwback supermarket with unique food items, and right now it has "Houston's Largest Selection Kosher for Passover." That matters because it's the short season for Kosher Coca-Cola.

I'm not from Sugar Land, but I love sugar in my Coke. In fact, I was born in Indiana, which doesn't mean I don't like corn in my Coke, specifically high-fructose corn syrup. It's not for health reasons. The problem is the unctuous mouth-feel, like there's a few drops corn oil in my soda, and the addition of rum makes it even less palatable.

Kosher Cokes use the real stuff, due to the restriction on chametz (certain types of grain) and other leavening during Passover. The two-liter bottles have yellow caps with the letters OU-P, and Kosher L'Pesach written in Hebrew.

Unfortunately, the Coke comes in plastic PET bottles, which are gas-permeable. The soda loses its fizz in about two months, so no use hoarding Passover Coke for the summer.

That leaves Mexican Coca-Cola, in the glass bottles. I've always thought they were flat compared to the American version, so I did a head-to-head sugar comparison with Passover Coke. The Kosher soda has slightly more zing to it than the Mexican one, but it was negligible enough to prove me pleasantly wrong. The taste was the same.

That means that I'll be buying Kosher now and switching to Mexican in the summer, because I'd feel sacrilegious putting rum in a Passover soda.

Cuba Libré

  • 1½ ounce rum
  • 4½ ounce sugary Coca-Cola
  • 2 wedges lime or ½ key lime

Lightly muddle the lime in the bottom of a glass to extract the juice and some lime oil from the skin.

Pour in Coke, add ice cubes. Play "Guantanamera."




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Kris
Kris

John, does the kosher for passover cola really lose it fizz in 2 months? Some folks have kept it for a year with no problem, however the cola does tend to lose fizz quickly although gradual, for instance even if you limit the amount of time you open the bottle, only 3/4 of the bottle has fizz,and 1/4 of that is barely fizzy, you may have to open a new bottle to combine the flatness, while flatness occurs if there are 1 cup left, it seems that 2-3 cups have flatness but if the bottle is unopened it should still be great atleast for 2/3 of the bottle, No?

stevenjklein
stevenjklein

Why would you "feel sacrilegious putting rum in a Passover soda"? There's no Jewish stricture against drinking alcohol. Of course rum is made with yeast, so there's no kosher-for-passover rum. And anyway, only Jews are obliged to keep kosher.

I, too, like the kosher-for-passover coke, and do wish it was sold in cans or glass bottles.

John Kiely
John Kiely

Dig. Like I said, just being respectful, but I'll stick with the secular food from now on.You bring up another subject: How come all ads show glistening glass bottles of Coca-Cola, but we can only buy cans and plastic bottles in America?

bibulb
bibulb

I've been a firm believer in the Mexican Coke for a while now - Kroger, on the whole, carries 12 oz. bottles, while Central Market has half-liters. (Costco's sold 24-pack flats of the 12 oz. bottles as well, which is worth noting...)

Kris
Kris

I read that mexican cola may be a fraud and made with hfcs, is it $1 a bottle?

Kosheraware
Kosheraware

This post shows ignorance about Kosher dietary laws. To the best of my knowledge Coca Cola has always been Kosher. As for Passover, all foods that are consumed during that period need to be certified, Kosher for Passover. Without getting into a long explanation, some Jews eat and drink corn products that are Kosher for Passover as well, take a look at the ingredients of some of the items that are marked Kosher for Passover at Belden's. I and other people, would appreciate you checking your facts a bit more before you publish misinformation like this.

John Kiely
John Kiely

No I am not an expert on that subject. The corn inclusion (kitniyot) is traditionally Ashkenazic, and of course not everyone of the faith is Ashkenazic. Sephardim, for example, have different Kosher laws, to which you alude. This post was more a comparison of sugar Cokes, in a respectful manner, of which I am knowledgeable. Thank you.

Carrie
Carrie

That's exactly what I was taught, coming from an Ashkenazi family. To avoid accidentally eating grain (besides unleavened bread, matzo), you abstain from foods that could be made in to bread or are similar to grain. That includes corn and thus corn syrup, cornmeal, exc.

(obligatory citation: http://www.askmoses.com/en/lis...

John Kiely
John Kiely

Thanks for the clarity. Love the website, too.

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