Does Houston Really Need Any More People?

Categories: Random Ephemera

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Michael Wachs, an agent with the Hunter Real Estate Group, acknowledges that there is a lack of available inventory and in his professional opinion things need to change.

"From January to May of 2014, there has been a 6% increase in townhouse and condo sales from the previous year. And inventory is still incredibly low. People are having a tough time finding something. It's not hyperbole to say houses are going faster than ever: That's fact."

According to a recent report released by the GHP that was put together by The Perryman Group, from '12 to '40 there is an estimated population growth averaging 1.80 percent annually in the Houston area. What does that mean? Well by 2040 Houston could see a population of over 10 million. For your reference we are currently at roughly 6. For those of us that don't know math, that's 4 million people. Where the hell are all those people going to go?

Obviously, 2040 is a while away and by that point we can hope that Houston's infrastructure will be able to support its massive growth with flying cars a plenty, but that growth is already in full effect. Between the 2010 and 2012 census dates, Houston added 9,530 residents per month. And according to U- Haul's migration trend report, Houston was the number one destination for people to move to... for the fourth year running.

As is, traffic has become comically bad; the real estate market is starting to slow for the first time in recent months due to the sheer fact that we are running out of places to put people. Our schools are becoming over-populated and you have to literally wait on line for sometimes an hour to get into that new Italian place Coltivare.

I ask again: do we need more people here?

What I fear is that the more people that come, the worse off Houston will become. I am not trying to keep our gem of a city a secret, I just worry we cannot keep up with the growing impression of awesome that Houston is presenting to the world out there.

Wachs tends to agree that something's got to give. "My personal hope," he continues, "is that developers--residential, commercial, mixed--realize that the best thing to do for a buck and the best thing to do for Houston in the long run is to invest in some architecture... Give people something to care about."

I care about this city already, but I also worry that the bubble is going to burst. What do you think?


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53 comments
Pamela Walters
Pamela Walters

Not unless we can become a more eco friendly city!! Crazy how small municipalties in the NE have better recycling systems in place than we do!!

Mel Thomas
Mel Thomas

So true..I have seen so many out of state plates...Maybe the heat will drive them back lol

Pete Ck
Pete Ck

do we have enough jobs to keep everyone employed?

Sarah Sexton
Sarah Sexton

The more the merrier! I mean really, what's so terrible for sitting traffic for two solid hours..on a Saturday? Ok, maybe we should secure our borders too.

Robert541
Robert541

Human overpopulation is everybody's problem. The recent evidence is coming across the borders in the form of starving children. Haven't we 'got it' YET? How many more people do we need on this entire planet?

Machelle DeRon
Machelle DeRon

yep.....it's definitely getting busier....please people, stay away and let us enjoy our "secret"....go to Dallas! :D

Jacob Bocanegra
Jacob Bocanegra

if u want to goto a rockets,or astros game and have have the crowd in another teams jersay then by all means let the no driving ass ppl come....remember i warned u and u had the chance to stop it...

Christina Parasco
Christina Parasco

As the years go by I keep thinking to move or not to move. I'm born and raised here but mercy the freeways are crazier than ever. Now my kids are going to junior high so I don't want to uproot them. My thoughts of moving have almost turned into being stuck here......

Bradford Ashington
Bradford Ashington

all of these Voice Media weeklies (not just HP) are mimicking Buzzfeed....and Buzzfeeds sucks...SUCKS

Bradford Ashington
Bradford Ashington

u can start by offing yourself so that someone who actually provides a real, tangible benefit to society can take ur place. derp

Jacob Bocanegra
Jacob Bocanegra

there are no jobs here pick up the sunday paper! say something! do something! tax out of state plates. tax companies that hire out of state workers!!!

Jacob Bocanegra
Jacob Bocanegra

if the mayor will tax out of state ppl when they apply for apartments..... this cant continue were full and there's only oil and service jobs. the highways are full. we must make hard choices. unless u want ur rent to double and housing prices to double someone needs to do something..

Marcy Basile
Marcy Basile

Houston Press compiles the most lists, though!

flakpanther
flakpanther

That guy below is an asshole, but his basic point is correct. Houston is really sparsely populated. What's more, as much as Houston is growing, the exurbs are growing much faster. It's a regional thing and it's not Houston's unique genius that's increasing the population. The solution is legalizing dense space, but as long as two (!) parking spaces per household and wide streets are the law I agree that things will simply get worse. Houston claims to want the population but does not know how to be an actual city and not just a giant slightly denser-than-average suburb.

cewingate
cewingate

I grew up in Houston.  I love this city.  I think it is good to have new interest in Houston, because the inner loop is seeing so much restoration.  Unfortunately, a lot of the revamping is making the best places in Houston, like the old bungaloes and other craftsman homes disappear.  The Heights is known for its quaint Victorian homes. But these are now far fewer in numbers.  If only we could clean up the city and clean out the slums inside the 610 loop without destroying the feel of good neighborhoods like Oak Forest. There are a lot of truly run down places that need total demolishing, but the Heights and Oak Forest should be protected from big, ugly new houses. 

zhouston73
zhouston73

We only waited for 25 minutes at Coltivare... I moved here last year from Phoenix. Houston is a lot nicer, at least inside the Loop. I try to stay inside the Loop because why go outside it? There's nothing out there that I can't get in here. When I get close to the 610 I feel like I better turn around. And then I do. If I had to live outside the Loop I might as well go back to Phoenix.

Jo Evins
Jo Evins

As long as aforementioned carpet baggers don't whine constantly bout texas being 'texas

Aflac Ins Agent
Aflac Ins Agent

The way the gas prices are going "lets just ride our bikes"!

Noelle A. Perry
Noelle A. Perry

It's "a force to be reckoned with." Please hire a proofreader.

painpillplease
painpillplease

I cashed out my Oak Forest home. 35k over asking. Paid cash for a similar home up the street in Inwood Pines. Literally 5 minutes up TC Jester. Your neighborhood is blowing up, I figured I needed to separate a fool and his money while I could. Now I am living mortgage free. I couldn't be happier.

Of course all your OF friends will think you are moving to the hood. I personally don't mind seeing the cowboys of color on Sundays. Reminds me I live in Texas.

Roberto NoOnions
Roberto NoOnions

Oh jesus... Are we at this point in the news cycle already? I guess we can start making "WELCOME TO HOUSTON, PLEASE DON'T MOVE HERE" shirts.

Autumn Smith
Autumn Smith

Yep, because name-calling is totally a way to let people know you're a rational being capable of participating in civil discourse. Heh.

Abe Awad
Abe Awad

The economy here has always been good before the influx.

Abe Awad
Abe Awad

Says the guy with a burning American flag as a profile pic? Get back under your bridge.

Bradford Ashington
Bradford Ashington

"space is running out" pop density for the following major cities in the US: Phoenix, AZ: 2,797.8/sq mi (1,080.2/km2) Austin, TX: 2,758.43/sq mi (1,065.04/km2) HOUSTON, TX: 3,503/sq mi (1,391/km2) Denver, CO: 4,044/sq mi (1,561/km2) Detroit, MI: 5,142/sq mi (1,985/km2) Los Angeles, CA: 8,225/sq mi (3,176/km2) Chicago, IL: 11,864.4/sq mi (4,447.4/km2) New York (Manhattan): 70,825.6/sq mi (27,345.9/km2) Yes, even Detroit despite having lost over half of its peak population in the 1950s is STILL more "crowded" than Houston. Mind you, these figures only take into acct the city propers, not the outlying burbs which tend to be even less dense (in every sense of the term. LOL). "and costs are rising. " Basic supply and demand. You stupid capitalist-loving slobs love to gloat about your purported "booming economy" but constantly whine about the side effects. Stop you're fucking bitching.....DWEEB!

Javier Gomez
Javier Gomez

Not bad at all, I welcome new people to our great city, a Shiner toast to you all, time to open the flood gates!

Autumn Smith
Autumn Smith

Indeed! My rent is going up $30 due to rising property taxes, and it went up $30 last year too. Soon I won't be able to afford to live in my own freaking neighborhood because all of the new people coming in and overdeveloping everything.

Mathew Burnstein
Mathew Burnstein

Autumn Smith is mentally ill. she needs to get treated for manic depression and anxiety disorder.

Texano78704
Texano78704

Hmm, is this a reposting of an article written about NYC in 1900?

gossamersixteen
gossamersixteen topcommenter

Oh no $30, mine went up $300 a month downtown due to property taxes. Which is why I cashed out, and moved to Oak Forest.

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